Great Reset Nomenclature

The Great Reset is the name of the partnership formed between the United Nations and the World Economic Forum. The endgoal is to usher in the objectives of Agenda 2030. The United Nations’ purpose is to implement global governance. The World Economic Forum is a consortium of members which include governments, corporations, NGOs, foundations, universities, international-level institutions, trade associations and more. Each year, key individuals from the aforementioned group meet in Davos, Switzerland to discuss to global economic matters. The 2021 Davos convention focused almost entirely upon implementation of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals elaborated upon within Agenda 2030.

The following are buzzwords to be aware of when reading news, publications, books, websites, trade publications, SEC filings – basically every form of medium known to man:

  • Rebirthing culture
  • Water-wise
  • Climate change
  • Climate action
  • Climate refugee
  • Climate migrant
  • Climate justice
  • Climate awareness
  • Climate warrior
  • Visioning
  • Synergies
  • Leave no one behind
  • Mainstreaming
  • People, Planet, Profits
  • Reporting requirements
  • Domestic extremism
  • New economy
  • Regenerative tourism
  • Green bond
  • Green investment
  • Green Funds
  • Medical inequality
  • Medically necessary
  • Co-creation: science and society
  • The geopolitics of vaccine inequality
  • Sustainable
  • Equality
  • Equity
  • Green New Deal
  • Build Back Better
  • Circular economy
  • Nature-based solutions
  • Ecological connectivity
  • Stakeholder capitalism
  • Fourth Industrial Revolution
  • Robotics for nature
  • Cyber threats
  • Cyber security
  • Cyber fingerprint
  • Digital fingerprint
  • Carbon reduction
  • Net zero carbon emissions
  • Triple Bottom Line
  • ESG ( Environment, Sustainability, Governance)
  • Neighborhood revitalization
  • Restoration
  • Asset based community development
  • Netizen
  • Digital currency
  • Ledger
  • Invasive species
  • “DEMOCRACY”
  • Traffic calming
  • Greenways
  • Blueways
  • Direct Instruction
  • Smart cities
  • Smart devices
  • Smart development
  • Vax
  • Community-based
  • Life-Long Learning
  • Governance
  • Reinventing Government
  • Communitarian
  • Resilient city
  • Clean energy
  • Renewable resources
  • Efficiency credits
  • Human Capital
  • Rethinking
  • Carbon credits
  • Communitarianism
  • Common Core
  • Transformational change
  • Building a shared future
  • World Conservation Congress
  • Anchoring biodiversity to nature

Exploring Different Aspects of the Anti-Defamation League (ADL) – by Muunyayo

This examination of the ADL is broken up into different parts that I’ve assembled based on a “internet black hole” I went on this evening.

  • Examination of the ADL income tax return, Form 990
  • Examination of affiliated ADL entities, found on Form 990
  • Examination of highest paid contractors, one in particular
  • Biographical information of key ADL Board members
  • Biographical information of key ADL management
  • The ADL’s largest contribution to society, their Hate Symbol Symbols of European Heritage database

The ADL 2018 Form 990 – Highlights

Form 990 is the tax return filed annually for entities exempt from income tax aka not for profit businesses. In order to maintain an entity’s tax-exempt status, it is required that they file this tax return annually, amongst other requirements. Below is the first page of the tax return, the name of the entity and it’s EIN (employer identification number) match that of information in the Guide Star database (the catechism of tax-exempt entity research for accountants and attorneys).

The next item of interest that came to me is the CEO, Jonathan Greenblatt’s annual income, especially since he only works 20 hours per week, as disclosed on the tax return.

The next item of interest, a required disclosure on Form 990, is Schedule R, disclosure of “Related Organizations and Unrelated Partnerships”. The tax ID number aka EIN is the unique identifier used by the IRS to pinpoint any entity. Our social security number is the equivalent of a business’ EIN. Here on this Schedule R we see two organizations that fall within IRS jurisdiction and one that is based is Israel, which does not have nexus in the United States, therefore it is outside the IRS wheelhouse.

But there are two in the US:

  • Anti-Defamation League Foundation
  • ADLF Common Fund

Now, the Anti-Defamation League Foundation files a Form 990-PF, the PF acronym for Private Foundation. The tax return itself did not raise any unexpected alarms, however, a private foundation in the State of New York is required to file an annual report with the Attorney General. The annual report includes both the Form 990-PF and a copy of audited financial statements (performed by an outside, independent CPA firm). The Notes to the financial statements disclose the guts beneath the numbers. So let’s have a look here (this is for the fiscal year end 2017):

We see the filing with the Attorney General for Charitable Organizations is made as a dual filing, between the ADL and the ADL Foundation. Standard stuff.

Next, as included with the Attorney General filing, aside from the income tax returns, are the audited financial statements. We see the audit was performed by KPMG, known as one of the “Big Four” public accounting firms. Big Four firms audit Fortune 500 companies, large charitable organizations (like the American Red Cross) and other engagements that are large in scope.

Here is the standard Auditor Report that heads audited financial statements and the notes to the financial statements:

Within the notes there are two very significant disclosures …the first is the amount of money the ADL has within it’s Net Assets. There are three categorizations used for a tax-exempt entity in Net Assets (like a for-profit entity, has line items in it’s Equity section, Preferred Stock, Common Stock, Retained Earnings, etc):

  • Unrestricted Net Assets – this amount is available to the entity to spend at will. There have been no designations placed on the funds by the source of the grant/charitable contribution as to how the funds can be used.
  • Temporarily Restricted Net Assets – this amount is comprised of charitable contributions that have stipulations attached to them, per the source of the contribution. For example, a source makes a $1 million dollar donation, within the contribution letter, it states the money can only be dispersed for rent or perhaps for purchase of new technology).
  • Permanently Restricted Net Assets – this is known as the endowment. The principal cannot be touched, however the income generated (dividends, distributions, interest earned, rents, royalties and realized gains on the sale of marketable securities) can be funneled into supporting operating activities.

Here is the breakdown of Net Assets:

Take a look at the near $107 million dollars in assets in Investments…is the ADL in operation to stop anti-Semitism? Or are their activities from a financial standpoint at the very heart of where anti-Semitism grows? Let’s look closely…

The ADL has a near $69M endowment. Pretty handsome indeed. As I mentioned before, the notes to the financial statements disclose the guts beneath the numbers. Let’s view Note 7:

There are interesting subsections within the endowment, for instance, “International Affairs and Interfaith Programs”. Money to support propaganda on behalf of Muslims, illegal immigrants – imagine the possibilities!

The most striking disclosure within the notes to the financial statements comes here, Note 3, a breakdown of the Investments line item:

I’ve attempted to highlight “Absolute Return Funds” only however I am on a mobile device and my fingers are not skinny enough. What on earth are Absolute Return Funds? Moreover, $35 million dollars are placed with these magic funds. It is common place within the internal treasury mechanism of a company, foundation, or otherwise to keep it’s cash in various investment vehicles, outside of bank accounts alone, like Treasury Notes, stocks, mutual funds, Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs), etc.

I worked as an auditor for a solid decade and never did I see the usage of “Absolute Return Funds” ever. Both the connotation and denotation of “Absolute” is completely against the grain of prudent accounting.

WHAT THE FUCK ARE Absolute Return Funds?

And well – hedge funds – hedge funds are the vehicle of absolute return. There is nothing more Jewish than hedge funds. So it’s befitting of the ADL to sink their coffers into hedge funds. I suppose it would be foolish to think they would invest in a farm in Nebraska or a coal mine in West Virginia. Hedge funds and the ADL – who would have guessed?

Back to Form 990 – Part VII – FIVE HIGHEST PAID CONTRACTORS

For each of the five I did research on the internet, news articles and such and also looked up the corporate filings (Articles of Incorporation/Annual Reports/etc.) and found no gleaming conflicts of interest. However, Purpose Campaign, LLC – their website spells out why the ADL would utilize this company for advocacy:

Purpose is the go-to advocacy group for the globalist class. Bloomberg Philanthropies, ACLU, UNICEF, World Wildlife Foundation (which is a UN entity), Rockefeller Foundation, Google, Nike, the Chan-Zuckerberg Initiative, the WHO, Amnesty International… networking amongst the donor class is at the heart of the ADL fundraising methods.

Now, a profile of Purpose’s Founder and CEO:

Globalist roots: keynote speaker at Davos, the Chatham House, the United Nations and the RSA. He also served on the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on Civic Participation. Finally, he worked for McKinsey & Co, a major cog in the machine called The Great Reset.

BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION OF KEY PEOPLE

This examination of public filings reveals some interesting details about the ADL. During my internet browsing black hole I finally took a look at the ADL website and wanted to see it’s Board of Directors and Key Management. Some of the biographical information blew my mind:

CEO: Jonathan Greenblatt – Before ADL, Greenblatt served in the White House as Special Assistant to President Obama and Director of the Office of Social Innovation.

  • Greenblatt served in the White House and most certainly networked with influencial individuals that held decision making authority.

Senior Vice President, Policy: Eileen HershenovDirectly prior to coming to the ADL, she served as General Council and head of public policy for the Wikimedia Foundation, which operates Wikipedia, the fifth-most visited internet site. Prior to that, she was General Council at Consumer Reports and before that, General Council at the Open Society Foundations.

  • Wikipedia is heavily biased in favor of the Left.
  • Open Society Foundations in George Soros’ outfit.

Senior Advisor to the CEO: George Selim – Prior to his appointment at ADL in 2017 as Senior Vice President of Programs, George served in the administrations of Presidents Bush, Obama and Trump. He served as the Department of Homeland Security’s first Director of the Office for Community Partnerships. Concurrently, he was selected to lead a newly created Countering Violent Extremism Task Force to coordinate government efforts and partnerships to prevent violent extremism in the United States. Before assuming these roles, George served for four years at the White House on the National Security Council Staff where he focused on policy development and program implementation matters for both domestic and international security threats. Prior to his work at the White House, George served as a Senior Policy Adviser at the DHS Office for Civil Rights.

  • The DHS and National Security Council under the Biden administration have made it priority to target domestic White supremacist extremism.
  • The ADL works closely with major social media networks on the monitoring of hate speech, at a minimum.
  • The ADL, DHS, FBI and the Establishment at large relish the thought of a nationwide political dissident roundup.

Vice President, Law Enforcement & Analysis: Greg Ehrie – a 29-year veteran of government service. Having spent 22 years with the FBI, he most recently served as Special Agent in Charge of the Newark Field Office, managing all FBI investigations throughout the state of New Jersey. He has served in a variety of roles, including as the supervisor of the New York Office’s Domestic Terrorism squad, and later as the Section Chief of the FBI’s Domestic Terrorism Operations Section, where he was responsible for all domestic terrorism investigations throughout the U.S. and oversaw the operations of the National Joint Terrorism Task Force.

  • The FBI has evolved into a subversive operation, entrapment of “right wing” dissidents, as seen recently with the leadership within the Proud Boys, Oathkeepers and the stunt to kidnap the governor of Michigan.
  • The ADL provides training on antisemitism to the FBI.
  • The FBI has made it priority to shut down political dissidents.
  • This man working at the ADL after his high level position within the FBI is very alarming.

Vice President, Technology: Larry Chertoff -Earlier in his career, Larry worked on Wall Street where he led large teams developing innovative custom software at firms including Thomson Financial, Societe Generale, Shearson Lehman Brothers, and Smith Barney. Larry Chertoff is the brother of Michael Chertoff.

  • Michael Chertoff was the co-author of the USA PATRIOT Act
  • Michael Chertoff was United States Secretary of Homeland Security to serve under President George W. Bush
  • Michael Chertoff served on the Board of BAE Systems, a major arms contractor that benefits from the annual defense spending budget.

Vice President, Center for Technology and Society: Dave Sifry – Dave joined ADL in 2019 after a storied career as a technology entrepreneur and executive. He founded six companies including Linuxcare and Technorati, and served in executive roles at companies including Lyft and Reddit. In addition to his entrepreneurial work, Dave was selected as a Technology Pioneer at The World Economic Forum.

  • Technorati was huge in the aughts.
  • The World Economic Forum = the Great Reset

Conclusion on the Leadership base: globalist, one world order people completely inline with the Zionist agenda. No surprise there, yet the expanse of the penetration into so many facets of economic, legal, financial, technological and government matters is mind-blowing.

HATE SYMBOLS DATABASE Pure Character Assassination

This hate symbols database has a recurring theme as to what constitutes a “hate symbol”. The recurring theme is many of the symbols relegated to the hate database are ancient European symbols that have been used in anecdotal scenarios in modern times. “Neo-nazi” co-opting, “Aryan” prison gangs and “White supremacists” random use of ancient European substance – means that ancient European substance is equivalent to soap and lampshades according to the ADL. Below is a sample of symbols in their database and associated reasons for appointing the hate to the symbol. The ADL themselves explain the true origin/use of the symbols AND they state that most modern use is that of “non-extremists”.

Runes

Othala Rune
Life Rune
Tyr Rune

Runic alphabets are pre-Roman alphabets used widely across Europe, easily recognizable because of their angular characters. There are many different varieties of runic alphabets, of which the most well known is the so-called Elder Futhark (the name is derived from the sounds of the first six characters).

Runic alphabets are still used today in many mainstream and non-racist contexts. However, white supremacists have also appropriated the runic alphabet, in large part because Nazi Germany often used runes in its symbology. White supremacists use runes for transliterated Roman letters, creating an alternative alphabet (sometimes viewed as a code, since the vast majority of people do not know runic letters).

Because runes are still commonly used in a variety of non-racist forms, their appearance should always be carefully analyzed in context.

Celtic Cross

The Celtic Cross, as typically depicted, is a traditional Christian symbol used for religious purposes as well as to symbolize concepts like Irish pride. As such, it is a very common symbol and primarily used by non-extremists.

Today, this verson of the Celtic Cross is used by neo-Nazis, racist skinheads, Ku Klux Klan members and virtually every other type of white supremacist.

Other Symbols

The Confederate Battle Flag – first of all, this version lacks blood stains, which calls the ADL’s credibility into question.

WP? – WordPress should look into this.

This is a perfect example of the obfuscation tactics the ADL uses in this database. This symbol means “not equal to” in mathematics.

This is called the “Anti-Antifa” symbol. Antifa, the paramilitary group for Google’s human resources policy, tranny rights and other kosher stuff. Antifa today is a group of upper middle class white kids from the suburbs that target the property of the working class. Opposing black bloc tactics means you are in favor of genocide, per the ADL.

My Disposition: the ADL is the enemy.

United Nations Greenlights Big Tech Mega-Database To Censor Americans Deemed ‘Extremists’ — Hellbound and Down

A Big Tech-led group is using its influence and power to broaden its shared censorship database to curb “extremist content” and collect video and images deemed white supremacist, according to Reuters. The expansion comes after the group “took on renewed urgency” after the Jan. 6 Capitol riot, which Democrats and tech giants continue to use as an […]

United Nations Greenlights Big Tech Mega-Database To Censor Americans Deemed ‘Extremists’ — Hellbound and Down

Open Society Foundations: The Mission

This foundation was created by George Soros. It’s utopian vision involves inverting reality, reason, rationale, common sense and your visceral reaction to the thought of being erased and replaced – invert these notions on their heads….clownworld is now pisseartth indeed…

Intertwined Involvement of UN Entities

On a quasi-ADHD inspired tour thru the components of the Great Reset and Agenda 2030, I have come across documents introduced since 2015 in which the intertwining nodes of the Globalist Consortium known as the UN all have had much in common …quietly all of these entities are in LOCK STEP!!

World Trade Organization (WTO)

The WTO is central to achieving the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), which set targets to be achieved by 2030 in areas such as poverty reduction, health, education and the environment. This publication looks at the role played by the WTO in delivering the SDGs and identifies a number of steps that would help to ensure that international trade contributes to accelerating progress in achieving these goals.

“Mainstreaming trade to attain the Sustainable Development Goals” shows that by delivering and implementing trade reforms which are pro-growth and pro-development and by continuing to foster stable and fair trading relations across the world, the WTO is playing an important role in delivering the SDGs, just as it did with the Millennium Development Goals before them.

The book examines the SDGs from economic, social and environmental perspectives and outlines how trade is contributing to making progress in each of these areas, including through reducing poverty, improving health and supporting efforts to tackle environmental degradation. It also recommends a number of steps to help accelerate progress in achieving the SDGs.

Recommendations on ways to accelerate progress in achieving the SDGs

The publication makes the following recommendations:

  1. Mainstream trade into national and sector strategies to achieve the SDGs.
  2. Strengthen the multilateral trading system so that it can continue supporting inclusive growth, jobs and poverty reduction.
  3. Continue reducing trade costs including through full implementation of the WTO’s Trade Facilitation Agreement.
  4. Build supply-side capacity and trade-related infrastructure in developing countries and least-developed countries.
  5. Focus on export diversification and value addition.
  6. Enhance the services sector.
  7. Apply flexible rules of origin to increase utilization of preference schemes.
  8. Ensure that non-tariff measures do not become barriers to trade.
  9. Make e-commerce a force for inclusion.
  10. Support micro, small and medium-sized enterprises to engage in international trade.

IAEA
International Atomic Energy Agency
  1. Since the adoption of the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs, has the governing body of your organization taken (or will it take) any decisions or new strategies to guide the implementation of the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs? If any, please provide a brief summary below, including the overarching vision of your organization.
    The statutory objective of the IAEA is to seek to accelerate and enlarge the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health and prosperity throughout the world. The IAEA has been contributing effectively to sustainable development for over 60 years by making peaceful nuclear technology available for development in areas such as human health, food and agriculture, energy, natural resource management and public and environmental protection.

2.1 SDG-specific strategies, plans or work programmes
During planning of the Agency’s Programme and Budget and the TC Programme for 2018-2019 and 2020-2021, where appropriate, the Secretariat identified the relevant programmes/projects contributing to the SDGs. The IAEA continues to pursue and adapt its programme of work within the framework of its Statute to meet the evolving needs and development goals of its Member States.

The IAEA has reviewed the Programmes at the planning stage with regards to their relevance to specific SDGs. In view of possible contribution of projects to multiple SDGs, a limit of maximum three SDGs were applied to each project.

In addition, fields of activity used in the IAEA TC Programme were linked to SDGs. With a view to ensure that Member States national priorities are connected to the SDGs, the Secretariat revised the templates for Country Profile Frameworks to reflect national development plans and priorities, country specific analyses and lessons learned from past cooperation. Moreover, the Secretariat organized trainings for Member States on how to better link proposed programmes and projects to the SDGs.

2.2 Aligning the structure of the organization with the transformative features of the 2030 Agenda, including any challenges and lessons learned in doing so
No changes to the structure of the organization were considered necessary for the implementation of the 2030 Agenda.

2.3 Readjusting or updating results-based budgeting and management, including performance indicators:
The IAEA continues to apply a results-based management approach to its Programme and Budget. Existing indicators for development related projects reflect relevant performance indicators for the SDGs

3.1 Mainstreaming the SDGs in development plans and policies or through national sustainable development plans/strategies:
The IAEA Technical Cooperation Programme serves as the major vehicle for technology transfer and capacity building and comprises national, regional and interregional projects formulated within the areas where nuclear techniques can contribute to address the development challenges, such as hunger, human health, energy, and climate change. The IAEA is closely working with its Member States and supports them in their efforts to achieve the SDGs.

The IAEA has organized numerous outreach events on how nuclear technology can help Member States to achieve the SDGs.

3.4 Science, technology and innovation for the SDGs:
To better assist Member States in the implementation of the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs through the application of nuclear science and technologies, two new interregional projects were developed by the IAEA, namely: “Applying Nuclear Science and Technology in Small Island Developing States in Support of the Sustainable Development Goals and the SAMOA Pathway” and “Utilizing the Sustainable Development Goals to Integrate Nuclear Science and Technology in Member States’ Attainment of their National Development Plans”.

3.5 Multi-stakeholder partnerships:
Partnerships are essential to the IAEA work. In the field of comprehensive cancer control and treatment, the IAEA works closely with IARC and WHO; in the area of food and agriculture, the IAEA works with FAO, and has an FAO-IAEA Joint Division in its HQ in Vienna. The IAEA has a number of formal partnership arrangements with UN entities and other bilateral and multilateral entities and research institutes. A key tool for identifying relevant development partnerships is the UNDAF. As of the end of 2017, the IAEA was signatory of 54 UNDAFs.

3.7 Leveraging interlinkages across SDG goals and targets:
The IAEA directly contributes to SDGs 2, 3, 6, 7, 13, 14, 15 and 17.

4.4 Organizing side evens or speaking at the HLPF:
The IAEA participated in the expert meeting in preparation for 2017 HLPF that was held in Vienna from 14 – 16 December 2016. This meeting looked at preparing institutions and policies for integrated approaches to implementation of the 2030 Agenda. The Agency spoke on integrated approaches to support SDG9.

At the HLPF 2017, the IAEA supported side events organised by Malaysia and Botswana on the contribution of nuclear science and technology to development. Within the framework of the HLPF 2018, the IAEA conducted a training course on the SDG7 and participated in a side event on the Global Agenda for SDG7 Action. The IAEA also hosted an exhibition booth at the preparatory Global SDG7 Conference, disseminating information on energy planning support to Member States for achieving SDG7.

  1. How has your organization cooperated with other UN system organizations to achieve coherence and synergies in the implementation of the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs? In this regard, has your organization launched or intend to launch any joint programmes or projects in collaboration with other UN entities? Are there any results or lessons you would like to highlight that might help improve the design and impact of such efforts? Has your organization participated in any of the following coordination systemwide mechanisms or any other relevant platform – CEB, UNDG, EC-ESA Plus, RCMs, UN-Energy, UN-Water, UN-Ocean, IAEG, IATT? Please specify which and indicate any suggestions you may have about improving collaborations within and across these mechanisms/platforms:
    The IAEA works in close partnership with Member States, United Nations agencies, research organizations and civil society to maximize the contribution of nuclear science and technology to the achievement of development priorities.

For example, with regards to SDG 3, the IAEA works closely with IARC and WHO in the field of comprehensive cancer control and treatment; on the SDG2, the IAEA has a FAO-IAEA Joint Programme on Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture; on the implementation of SDG9, there is an ongoing dialogue with UNIDO on industrial applications; on SDG 14, the IAEA works with UNEP.

  1. How has your organization engaged with stakeholder groups, both in supporting implementation at the country, regional and global levels, and within your own organization? If yes, please provide main highlights, including any lessons learned:
    The IAEA staff engages stakeholders within the organization, with outside partner organizations and counterparts from Member States, as appropriate, to develop and implement relevant activities in accordance with the IAEA’s Result Based Approach to deliver the desired results.

While project ownership lies with the Member States, the technical cooperation programme is proposed by Member States and developed jointly with the Secretariat. The programme is based on an assessment of the development priorities and conditions in each specific country or region, as expressed in their respective national development plans, Country Programme Frameworks (CPFs), and United Nations Development Assistance Frameworks (UNDAFs).

  1. Has your organization organized any conferences, forums or events designed to facilitate exchange of experience, peer and mutual learning? If yes, please provide a brief summary below and include lessons learned and gaps identified based on the outcomes of these events. Please also include any events you plan to organize in the coming years.
    The IAEA organizes numerous conferences and other events to facilitate knowledge exchange to support its Member States in the peaceful use of nuclear technologies. In September 2018, within the framework of the 62nd General Conference, the IAEA hosted the Scientific Forum “Nuclear Technology for Climate: Mitigation, Monitoring and Adaptation” where presenters from over 20 countries showed that nuclear technology must be part of the solution to climate change, and public awareness of this contribution should be raised.

Moreover, in November 2018, the IAEA held a Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Science and Technology: Addressing Current and Emerging Development Challenges. This first ever event facilitated a high-level dialogue on nuclear science, technology and applications for peaceful uses while provided an opportunity to consider high-impact innovations that can be integrated into the Member States’ strategies and plans for achieving the Sustainable Development Goals.

For more information on events organized by the IAEA see: https://www.iaea.org/events

  1. Is there any other information you would like to share, including annual reports of your organization and any impact assessment or evaluation reports? If yes, please use the space below and attach the document(s). Please also use this space to provide any other information, comments or remarks you deem necessary:
    Annual Reports, the Nuclear Technology and Nuclear Safety Reviews, Technical Cooperation Report.

IMF
International Monetary Fund
  1. Since the adoption of the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs, has the governing body of your organization taken (or will it take) any decisions or new strategies to guide the implementation of the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs? If any, please provide a brief summary below, including the overarching vision of your organization.
    The IMF is committed, within the scope of its mandate, to the global partnership for sustainable development. The IMF has launched a number of initiatives to enhance its support for its member countries in crucial ways as they pursue the SDGs. Specifically, the IMF:
  • has expanded financial support for low-income developing countries, including: (i) a 50 percent increase in access norms and limits for all IMF concessional financing; (ii) zero percent interest rate on a permanent basis for IMF lending under the Rapid Credit Facility , (ii) an increase in access limits under the emergency financing instruments for countries hit by large natural disasters; and (iv) an extension of the zero percent interest rate to all other IMF concessional loans until at least end-2018. A comprehensive review of IMF concessional facilities is underway and expected to be completed this year;
  • is scaling up support for developing countries to boost domestic revenue mobilization, including by collaborating with other international organizations through the new Platform for Collaboration on Tax . The IMF provides technical assistance on tax policy and administration to over 100 countries every year and is scaling up its support for developing countries, including, where needed, the coverage of international tax issues;
  • is providing support—through its Infrastructure Policy Support Initiative—to member countries seeking to increase public investment in infrastructure. The initiative seeks to deepen the IMF’s macroeconomic policy advice and capacity building work to help countries tackle large infrastructure gaps without endangering public debt sustainability. Several such pilot programs are underway. Moreover, the IMF’s new debt limits policy adds flexibility to manage financing needs to support growth and investment while maintaining prudent debt levels. The IMF is also reforming the debt sustainability framework for low-income developing countries to better guide countries’ borrowing decisions and maintain public debt on a sustainable path;
  • is bolstering its support to fragile and conflict states to address their specific challenges and wide and persistent capacity building needs, including through the new Capacity Building Framework , which seeks to support institution building goals, strengthen outcome monitoring, and enhance coordination with other partners;
  • is deepening and operationalizing its work on inequality and gender through a pilot approach. Under the initiative, inequality and gender related issues have been analyzed in more than 60 case studies and about 30 additional cases are in the pipeline.
  • is promoting deeper, more inclusive and more stable financial systems, through policy advice and TA. For example, the Financial Sector Stability Fund supports the delivery and follow-up TA and training through Financial Sector Stability Reviews (FSSRs), and developing balance sheet data and financial soundness indicators.
  • has stepped up support to countries vulnerable to natural disasters and climate change and is paying increasing attention to adaptation issues. In this regard, the IMF and WB have launched a joint Climate Change Policy Assessment (CCPA) providing country-specific frameworks assessing preparedness to climate change, climate mitigation and adaptation plans, and risk management strategies, with initial pilots including Seychelles and St. Lucia. Other country consultations examined carbon mitigation policies (Jamaica, Seychelles) and reforming energy policies (Sri Lanka, Vietnam).

3.3 Data and statistical capacity building:
The IMF has been contributing to the global efforts to monitor the implementation of the SDGs and serves as the custodian agency for four SDG indicators using its databases on macroeconomic and financial statistics. These include (i) the Financial Access Survey (FAS) for reporting on the number of commercial bank branches and ATMs per 100,000 adults to measure financial inclusion (SDG indicator 8.10.1); (ii) the Financial Soundness Indicator (FSI) database to provide several measures for financial sector regulation (SDG indicator 10.5.1); (iii) the Government Finance Statistics (GFS) database to measure total government revenue as a proportion of GDP, by source (SDG indicator 17.1.1); and (iv) the GFS database to measure the proportion of domestic budget funded by domestic taxes (SDG indicator 17.1.2.).

The IMF’s Statistics Department has a strong track record in providing extensive and well-targeted capacity development (CD) to help countries enhance their statistical capacities in the area of macroeconomic and financial statistics. This work, which currently accounts for more than half of the department’s output and makes the IMF one of the top five providers of statistics CD, has been buttressed by the IMF’s standard-setting role across several statistical topical areas.

With more challenging international environment emanating from the need to monitor the implementation of the SDGs and to help improve countries’ economic policy-making, the IMF has recalibrated its statistics CD strategy. In addition to CD being provided through its own resources, the IMF’s Regional Technical Assistance Centers, and technical assistance projects funded by bilateral partners, the IMF has recently also set up two multi-partner trust funds to provide technical assistance and training to low- and lower middle-income countries world-wide to respond to these new challenges. These are:

  • the Financial Sector Stability Fund, which under its statistics module helps countries (i) to compile and disseminate FSIs for use in financial sector analysis, policy formulation, and SDG monitoring; and (ii) implement the balance sheet approach to help identify economic risks and vulnerabilities countries are facing; and
  • the Data for Decisions (D4D) Fund, which will have four modules with a strong emphasis on operational data to provide

more and better data to policy makers for evidence-based decision-making. Work under the four modules will also be conducive to SDG monitoring, either directly benefiting the four SDG indicators for which the IMF was chosen as custodian agency (see above) or indirectly by enhancing the quality of key macroeconomic datasets that are linked to many of the 17 SDGs (especially the measurement of GDP). In addition, one module aims to roll out a new online learning curriculum providing training in eight fundamental macroeconomic statistical areas, which will be instrumental in developing compilers’ expertise, with expected positive externalities to other statistical areas (e.g., social and environmental statistics). Finally, one module will offer advice to countries’ national statistical systems to standardize, streamline, and automate their statistical infrastructure, thereby enabling countries to better respond to the more challenging data environment.

4.2 Contributing to policy/background briefs for the HLPF:

  • Reporting on progress on our commitments via the SG reports as requested
  • Leading on the drafting of a number of chapters (Domestic Public Resources, Debt and Debt Sustainability, Addressing Systemic Issues) and contributing to other chapters of the annual IATF report, which feeds into the HLPF reporting on 2030 Agenda reporting

4.4 Organizing side evens or speaking at the HLPF:
Co-hosting a side event during the 2016 HLPF on ‘The Cost of Corruption and Mitigating Strategies’

  1. How has your organization cooperated with other UN system organizations to achieve coherence and synergies in the implementation of the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs? In this regard, has your organization launched or intend to launch any joint programmes or projects in collaboration with other UN entities? Are there any results or lessons you would like to highlight that might help improve the design and impact of such efforts? Has your organization participated in any of the following coordination systemwide mechanisms or any other relevant platform – CEB, UNDG, EC-ESA Plus, RCMs, UN-Energy, UN-Water, UN-Ocean, IAEG, IATT? Please specify which and indicate any suggestions you may have about improving collaborations within and across these mechanisms/platforms:
    The IMF has partnered with the World Bank Group in a number of areas to support the implementation and achievement of the 2030 Agenda. Additionally, the Fund is part of the Platform for Collaboration on Tax with the OECD, UN and WB, which aims to better support countries in the challenges they face in relation to their tax systems. The Fund participates regularly in CEB meetings and ECESA+ meetings. We have no comments on how to improve collaboration within these groupings.
  2. How has your organization engaged with stakeholder groups, both in supporting implementation at the country, regional and global levels, and within your own organization? If yes, please provide main highlights, including any lessons learned:
    Yes. The Fund engages its member countries in key SDG issues of inclusion and environmental sustainability. The IMF is weaving lessons from policy-oriented research on a number of development issues into its operational work in a targeted manner. These include:
  • the role of diversification and structural transformation in sustained growth in developing countries—and the policies needed to support this change. Key policies include those to strengthen infrastructure in a cost-effective manner, support financial deepening, and boost agricultural productivity;
  • tackling income and gender inequality and promoting economic and financial inclusion by promoting job creation, enhancing the redistributive role of fiscal policy in an efficient manner, and boosting access to financial services while preserving financial stability; and
  • promoting environmental sustainability by reforming energy and enhancing resilience to climate-related events.

The Fund has adopted a pilot-based approach to explore emerging macro-critical issues, deepen its existing work and sharpen its bilateral surveillance in a range of areas that are relevant for the successful implementation of the SDGs. The nine pilot initiatives currently underway cover macro-financial issues, fiscal space, macro-structural issues, domestic revenue mobilization, international taxation, inequality, gender, energy/climate, and infrastructure. These initiatives will be expanded to the broader membership in a selective manner.

The IMF also engages on SDGs on a regular basis with Civil Society Organizations (CSOs), including more recently in the context of the inequality and gender pilot initiatives. For example, the IMF team for the Republic of Congo had constructive discussions on governance in the oil sector with CSOs, which helped design governance measures to reduce poverty and inequality. In Zambia, the inclusion of water and sanitation as part of social spending in the IMF-supported program drew on a recent CSOs’ position paper on gender and inequality issues. The Fund also participated in a CSO policy forum organized by Oxfam during the 2017 Annual Meetings on their assessment of the Fund’s inequality pilots experience, where the usefulness of ex-ante consultations with CSOs in the context of programs was highlighted, particularly in Ghana and Zambia.

  1. Has your organization organized any conferences, forums or events designed to facilitate exchange of experience, peer and mutual learning? If yes, please provide a brief summary below and include lessons learned and gaps identified based on the outcomes of these events. Please also include any events you plan to organize in the coming years.
    The IMF has organized several conferences, seminars and forums on the topics relevant to the SDGs, which are also extensively discussed during bilateral consultations with members and during the IMF Annual and Spring Meetings. A few examples of seminars include:

Regional Development: Fiscal Risks, Fiscal Space, and the Sustainable Development Goals

(IMF and JICA, JICA Research Institute, Tokyo, Japan February 1-2, 2017)

Financing for Development: The Way Forward (IMF-WB 2015 Spring meetings)

Seminar discussed the challenges of financing of the SDGs.

Making Macroeconomics Work for Women (IMF-WB, IMF-WB 2016 Annual meetings)

The seminar highlighted that achieving comprehensive economic development and reaching the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) require a decisive challenge to existing barriers to women’s economic equality.

Towards 2030: Trends, Opportunities, Challenges, and Policies for Inclusive Growth (IMF-WB 2017 Annual Meetings). The conference focused on how demographics and automation will shape the economic landscape for developing countries over the next two decades; what job opportunities and challenges to inclusive growth and gender equality can these long-term trends create for these countries; and the role of policies.

Upcoming conference

First Global Conference of the Platform for Collaboration on Tax – Taxation and the Sustainable Development Goals (Organized with the World Bank, OECD, and UN; February 14-16, 2018, at the United Nations HQ, NYC).

  1. Is there any other information you would like to share, including annual reports of your organization and any impact assessment or evaluation reports? If yes, please use the space below and attach the document(s). Please also use this space to provide any other information, comments or remarks you deem necessary:
    Below are the key references on the IMF’s support to the implementation of SDGs in member countries:

Board papers

IMF (2015a) Financing for Development: Revisiting the Monterrey Consensus, July 2015

IMF (2015b) Financing for Development: Enhancing the Financial Safety Net for Developing Countries

IMF (2015c) The Role of the IMF in Supporting the Implementation of the Post-2015 Development Agenda

IMF (2015d) The Managing Directors Statement on the Role of the Fund in Addressing Climate Change

Staff discussion notes

SDN/15/18 From Ambition to Execution: Policies in Support of Sustainable Development Goals

SDN/16/01: After Paris: Paris: Fiscal, Macroeconomic, and Financial Implications of Climate Change

  1. In your view, what should a strategic plan for the UN system in support of the 2030 Agenda and SDGs look like? What key elements should it include and major challenges address in such a road map?
    A strategic plan for the UN system in support of the 2030 could include the following key elements:
  • Stimulating peer learning and disseminating experience through the international event such as forums, seminars and conferences.
  • Monitoring the progress made by countries in the pursuit of the SDG objectives, to be frequently published through reports or the UN website.
  • The main challenges could include: (i) weak implementation capacity and the poor data quality in many developing countries; (ii) additionality in financing for the SDGs (ensure that the funding for SDGs comes from additional resources and not reallocations)
  1. Please indicate one or two endeavor or initiatives you suggest that the UN system organizations could undertake together to support the implementation of the SDGs between now and 2030:
    Create an initiative to build country’s capacity in producing and tracking SDGs indicators. This would require a coordinated approach among UN-specialized agencies and other international organizations.

UN HABITAT
United Nations Human Settlements Programme

1. Since the adoption of the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs, has the governing body of your organization taken (or will it take) any decisions or new strategies to guide the implementation of the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs? If any, please provide a brief summary below, including the overarching vision of your organization.
Yes, the Governing Council (GC) of UN-Habitat has on several occasions made recommendations that enhance the global monitoring, reporting and implementation of the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs.

A) The relationship between high-quality urbanization and development was recently emphasized at the 26th session of GC with several supporting resolutions in line with the implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, particularly Goal 11 of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), on making cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable. More concretely:

a. GC 26/8 acknowledged that: “… the implementation of the New Urban Agenda contributes to the implementation and localization of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development in an integrated manner”, while “taking note of the need of the work of UN-Habitat, within its mandate, to support the implementation of the New Urban Agenda, the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development including the Sustainable Development Goals, the Addis Ababa Action Agenda of the Third International Conference on Financing for Development, the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015‒2030 and the Paris Agreement adopted under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change through the development and implementation of its strategic plan”.

b. Further, GC/26/8 encourages UN-habitat, in accordance with the role of UN-Habitat as a focal point for sustainable urbanization and human settlements, including supporting the implementation and review of the New Urban Agenda, to collaborate with other United Nations programmes and entities, Member States, local authorities and relevant stakeholders, as well as through the mobilization of experts, to contribute to a United Nations system -wide strategy and continue generating evidence-based and practical guidance for the implementation of the New Urban Agenda and the related dimensions of the sustainable development goals, as well as to further develop the action framework for the implementation of the New Urban Agenda, in close consultation with Member States, local authorities and stakeholders”.

c. Finally, GC/26/8 requests UN-Habitat to “develop, within available resources and within the existing mandate of UN-Habitat, in close collaboration with other United Nations system entities, in consultation with member States, and taking into account the recommendations of the report of the independent assessment and the views of relevant stakeholders, a proposal for a unified global monitoring framework that will facilitate the tracking of progress towards achieving the goals of the New Urban Agenda, as well as the urban dimension of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, including the sustainable development goals, in a systematic manner;”


2.1 SDG-specific strategies, plans or work programmes
We have developed work plans at the agency level to monitor and report on the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs, specifically around the global monitoring of SDG 11. These efforts extend to strategies of how to work with regional commissions to enhance local capacities. In this regard, we are organizing regional workshops to build capacities of member states to monitor Goal 11 as well as addressing mechanisms for global data workflows from member states to international agencies.

Further, UN-Habitat has initiated a series of national consultations on a pilot basis within its technical cooperation activities in a few selected countries in support of development of methodologies and road maps to catalyze the implementation of NUA as an integral part of 2030 Agenda and SDGs.


2.2 Aligning the structure of the organization with the transformative features of the 2030 Agenda, including any challenges and lessons learned in doing so
The agency is also the global lead on monitoring of the NUA. As such a lot of alignments have been done with NUA and SDGs. Specifically, UN-Habitats CPI Global initiative has reviewed the existing indicators and targets and ensured that these are well alignment with the 2030 SDGs agenda and other global and regional agendas. Annual reporting mechanism are also aligned to track results along the various goals and targets of the SDGs as well as levels and amounts of investments in the various SDGs targets.

A new strategy of portfolio development is being developed to ensure a greater convergence of thematic areas and their results expected to contribute to the transformative dynamic of NUA and 2030 Agenda.


2.3 Readjusting or updating results-based budgeting and management, including performance indicators:
This has also been done and more alignments is expected in the next two years. Specifically, the CPI global monitoring framework has been mapped on several performance related dimensions and indicators that allows for easy reporting or impacts, budgets and overall management of results related to the 2030 SDGs agenda and other global goals.

2.4 Action to enhance support to the principle of “leaving no one behind” and to integrated policy approaches:
In our new monitoring tools including the CPI, data collection and analysis is all linked and designed to monitor and respond directly or indirectly to the SDG principle and associated dimensions which then ensure that a holistic monitoring process is implemented and this allows for documenting gaps, limitations and stories of people being left behind. Specific inequities at all levels are documented through qualitative data collection process and validated with secondary correlations. Secondly, we have also developed new spatial tools that enable us to study the urban spaces horizontally and vertically in a way that documents aspects of lives that are being left behind. A tools for collection of perceptions in cities is also available and compliments the largely quantitative based CPI tools.

2.5 Others:
In parallel, several projects and programmes have been designed aiming to support new legislation and planning policies at the national level towards strengthening rural-urban linkages, as well inclusive slum upgrading.

3.1 Mainstreaming the SDGs in development plans and policies or through national sustainable development plans/strategies:
a) Dialogues and sessions on capacity building were organized during the Habitat III conference in Quito. With over 150 representatives from various countries participating in several forums.

b) A specialized training on human settlements indicators within the SDG global monitoring framework was organized in Naivasha Kenya attracting over 15 member states and other private and CSO.NGOS representations.

c) Regional workshops on monitoring of the SDGS indicators linked to urban or human settlements where organized Africa, and for GCC countries in 2017, and plans are on track for similar workshops to be concluded in 2018 for the ESCAP, ECLAC and ESCWA regions.

d) Advisory missions have been organized for selected countries: Botswana, Kuwait, Swaziland, Zambia, Ethiopia, etc. These sessions provide an opportunity to work directly with a country and sharing knowledge, experiences and best practices on specific areas of implementation and monitoring of the 2030 agenda and SDGs.


3.2 Mainstreaming the SDGs in sectoral strategies, including specific SDG/target strategies:
Additional capacity development sessions are planned for the World Urban Forum in Feb 2018. These sessions will largely cover all the below areas highlighted

– Mainstreaming the NUA/SDGs in development plans and policies or through national sustainable development plans/strategies

– Mainstreaming the NUA/SDGs in sectoral strategies, including specific SDG/target strategies

– Data and statistical capacity building for monitoring NUA/SDGs

– Science, technology and innovation for monitoring NUA/SDGs

– Multi-stakeholder partnerships for monitoring NUA/SDGs

– Sub-national plans/strategies and implementation for the SDGs

– Leveraging interlinkages across SDG goals and targets

3.3 Data and statistical capacity building:
Yes, as described above.

3.4 Science, technology and innovation for the SDGs:
N/A


3.5 Multi-stakeholder partnerships:
Yes, as described above within the World Urban Forum context and others


3.6 Sub-national plans/strategies and implementation for the SDGs:
Yes, as described above.


3.7 Leveraging interlinkages across SDG goals and targets:
Yes, as described above.


3.8 Others:
N/A


4.1 Supporting the intergovernmental body of your organization in contributing to the thematic review of the HLPF:
UN-Habitat has participated in the last two rounds of the HLPF: 2016 and 2017. The agency contributed to the compilation of reviews and status reports of various goals and supported countries to package the data and status in their Voluntary National review reports. In 2017, UN-Habitat and other custodian agencies organized a global review on target 1.4 under Poverty goal and findings were shared through side events organized on the sidelines of the HLPF meeting. In 2018, UN-Habitat is leading the global review of the Goal 11 and is coordinating with several agencies and member states on the compilation of the status reports.


4.2 Contributing to policy/background briefs for the HLPF:
UN-Habitat has worked with other agencies to compile policy and background briefs for the HLPF. In 2017, a policy and status report was produced for targets under Goal 1 on Poverty.


4.3 Helping organize SDG-specific events in the preparatory process:
Yes UN-Habitat has organized and participated in several SDG-specific side events in the preparatory process as well as organized side events during the HLPF process. Events organized include a Local Authorities event aimed at providing a space for interaction with Member-States, to promote a commitment to the localization of the SDGs and its review, considering it an integral element to achieve the agenda. This was particularly helpful in terms of further convincing Member States to establish and further advance on national localization strategies, in collaboration with local and regional authorities. Our team also participated in regional preparatory process for HLPF organized in New York, and Asia.


4.4 Organizing side evens or speaking at the HLPF:
Yes, for the last two year, UN-Habitat participated in and organized several side events:

a) Local authorities and cities contributions to other SDGs (2017)

b) A side event on the Security of tenure Rights for men and women and other vulnerable groups (2017).

c) Session on use of Geospatial data for SDGs monitoring.

d) The urban lens: An accelerator of poverty eradication and prosperity. Interconnected approaches to address poverty, hunger, health and well- being, gender equality, resilient infrastructure and innovation (2017).

4.5 Supporting VNR process:
UN-Habitat has supported the VNR process for the last two years. We contributed directly to the provision of data for selected countries as well as shared latest methodological development to help guide countries in their reporting. We have also undertaken analyses of the VNR by goals and contributed policy briefs on the progress of various countries (see policy and advisory note on target 1.4).


5. How has your organization cooperated with other UN system organizations to achieve coherence and synergies in the implementation of the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs? In this regard, has your organization launched or intend to launch any joint programmes or projects in collaboration with other UN entities? Are there any results or lessons you would like to highlight that might help improve the design and impact of such efforts? Has your organization participated in any of the following coordination systemwide mechanisms or any other relevant platform – CEB, UNDG, EC-ESA Plus, RCMs, UN-Energy, UN-Water, UN-Ocean, IAEG, IATT? Please specify which and indicate any suggestions you may have about improving collaborations within and across these mechanisms/platforms:
There several ongoing on-going collaborations with various agencies on achieving coherence and synergies in the implementation of the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs. UN-Habitat is an active member of the Inter Agency Expert Group on SDGs where a lot of synergies are discussed on methodological developments, joint monitoring and reporting processes, and joint advisory missions for countries. So far several regional interactions with countries have been organized for several countries. These have mainly addressed the following issues/discussions a) examining jointly how the urban lens accelerates the integrated achievements of policy coherence and cross-sectoral approaches to accelerate the implementation of SDGs goals and other global agendas such as New Urban Agenda and the Sendai Framework. Jointly assessing the key elements of enabling institutional, policy and financial frameworks particularly in terms of what interventions in cities teach us about participatory approaches, particularly for the poor and disadvantaged in the spirit of leaving no one behind. Multi-stakeholder partnerships have also been discussed widely especially touching on what is needed to enhance the knowledge-policy-practice interface around the sustainability challenges and opportunities related to SDGs 1. Finally, a lot of joint discussions have also covered how urban lens can support data disaggregation, qualitative approaches to metrics and enhancing citizen-driven data.


6. How has your organization engaged with stakeholder groups, both in supporting implementation at the country, regional and global levels, and within your own organization? If yes, please provide main highlights, including any lessons learned:
UN-Habitat has worked through urban observatories, city leadership and local government ministries, to engage local stakeholder groups in various countries. At the regional and national levels, we have worked with relevant regional bodies such as UN regional commissions, Regional Mapping agencies, UCLG, etc. to engage blocks of countries/cities on supporting the implementation of the 2030 Agenda and SDGs. At the global level, we also work directly with UN agencies, other multilateral international agencies and organizations to support implementation of the SDGs. For example, in the Africa region, we organized a regional workshop in Botswana that attracted over 15 countries in the region. This workshop was used to share latest methodologies and approaches for global monitoring and reporting. Member states apricated the timing and depth of knowledge shared during this workshop. Many countries expressed the need to conduct such workshops in their countries to ensure more localization of the methodologies and approaches shared. However, our efforts are unable to reach out to too many countries or teams/other stakeholders within countries due to funding constraints.


7. Has your organization organized any conferences, forums or events designed to facilitate exchange of experience, peer and mutual learning? If yes, please provide a brief summary below and include lessons learned and gaps identified based on the outcomes of these events. Please also include any events you plan to organize in the coming years.
a) Habitat III conference Quito, Ecuador Oct 2016.

b) 1st Human Settlements Indicators Workshop on SDGs: Kenya, Feb 2017.

c) Expert Group meeting on definitions of cities for Global monitoring purposes; Brussels, April 2017

d) Africa Regional Workshop on Human Settlements Indicators, Dec 2017, Gaborone, Botswana.

e) World Urban Forum, Feb 2018.

f) Asia Regional Workshop on Human Settlements Indicators, April 2018, Bangkok, Thailand.

g) Arab States Regional Workshop on Human Settlements Indicators, May 2018, Beirut, Lebanon.

8. Is there any other information you would like to share, including annual reports of your organization and any impact assessment or evaluation reports? If yes, please use the space below and attach the document(s). Please also use this space to provide any other information, comments or remarks you deem necessary:
a) SDG 11 and human settlements Indicators Guide

b) National Sample of Cities guide for SDGs reporting

c) Global definitions of Cities Guide

d) UN-Habitat’s Global Activities Report 2017



9. In your view, what should a strategic plan for the UN system in support of the 2030 Agenda and SDGs look like? What key elements should it include and major challenges address in such a road map?
A strategic plan for the UNDS to effectively support the implementation of a transformative, universal, integrated and rights-based 2030 Agenda, and to meet the expectations of Member States, should include a theory of change transcending the traditional departmental distribution of roles and mandates. This should allow for UN to effectively “function as a system” in an integrated and coherent manner, at the global, regional and country level. Improved “functioning as a system” is a pre-requisite for continued relevance, better strategic positioning, and strengthened delivery of results and impact within the 2030 Development Agenda. World-wide, the strategic potential of “Delivering as ONE” in a view to achieve coherence and integration has been undisputed despite the challenge of fragmentation of funding sources and increasing lack of political support to the work of UN.


10. Please indicate one or two endeavor or initiatives you suggest that the UN system organizations could undertake together to support the implementation of the SDGs between now and 2030:
a) Joint fundraising initiatives for national implementation, and global monitoring and reporting for SDGs.

b) Strengthen UN collaboration and partnerships with private and public Foundations for increased synergy.

UNEP
United Nations Environment Programme

1. Since the adoption of the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs, has the governing body of your organization taken (or will it take) any decisions or new strategies to guide the implementation of the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs? If any, please provide a brief summary below, including the overarching vision of your organization.
Over 86 SDG targets are related to environmental sustainability; including at least one in each of the 17 Goals. UN Environment with its global environmental mandate takes the lead in facilitating the monitoring and reporting for 26 environment related SDG indicators for which it is the custodian and also has a key role in promoting a coherent delivery on the environmental dimension of all 17 SDGs. This is reflected in the medium term strategy for 2018-21 and in its programme of work 2018-19.

The United Nations Environment Assembly (UNEA) in its resolution 2/5 on “Delivering on the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development” among other things requested the UN Environment to support the coherent implementation of the environmental dimension of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, including at the national level.

The UNEA resolution 3/L.13, among other aspects, encourages Member States to take measures to promote and invest in innovative environmental policy interventions and actions to accelerate the implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.


2.1 SDG-specific strategies, plans or work programmes
The Medium Term Strategy (MTS) 2018-2021 was developed as a component of a long-term 2030 vision that is aligned to the SDGs. The MTS and subsequent programmes of work (PoW) are therefore designed to support the achievement of the goals.

2.2 Aligning the structure of the organization with the transformative features of the 2030 Agenda, including any challenges and lessons learned in doing so
Main challenges are in addressing the integrated nature of the SDGs and working across the whole organisation to ensure a behavioural change in the approach to project development to include the SDGs as part of the theory of change. Environment is embedded across the goals which making coherence a challenge in developing responses to support member states. Aligning the budget and finding additional resources for a broader agenda is also challenging.

2.3 Readjusting or updating results-based budgeting and management, including performance indicators:
The expected accomplishments and performance indicators in the PoW are aligned to the targets and indicators of the SDGs. Additionally, all project documents are now required to indicate whether they support the implementation of the SDGs and if so what portion of the indicative budget goes towards this support.

2.4 Action to enhance support to the principle of “leaving no one behind” and to integrated policy approaches:
UN Environment takes a rights based approach to implementing the goals and has a position paper on this. There is also an environmental and social safeguards unit that reviews projects

3.1 Mainstreaming the SDGs in development plans and policies or through national sustainable development plans/strategies:
– The “Integrated Approach for Environmental Sustainability in Development Planning” project sought to get a commitment from 5 pilot project countries to use the integrated approach to address environmental and developmental challenges – striking the balance between social, economic and environmental objectives – in designing their national policies and plans.

– UN Environment is also engaged in United Nations Development Assistance Frameworks (UNDAF) and regional mechanisms. Support at different levels has been provided to all 2017 UNDAF roll-out countries.


3.2 Mainstreaming the SDGs in sectoral strategies, including specific SDG/target strategies:
– The “Partnership for Action on Green Economy” (PAGE) seeks to put sustainability at the heart of economic policies and practices to advance the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. It supports countries and regions in reframing economic policies and practices around sustainability to foster economic growth, create income and jobs, reduce poverty and inequality, and strengthen the ecological foundations of their economies.

– The overall objective of SWITCH Africa Green is to support 6 countries in Africa to achieve sustainable development by engaging in transition towards an inclusive green economy, based on sustainable consumption and production patterns, while generating growth, creating decent jobs and reducing poverty.

– The “Poverty-Environment Action for Sustainable Development Goals” (PEAS) project is a delivery mechanism of capacity development support and technical assistance to help countries meet the SDGs with a focus on inclusive, equitable, pro-poor, climate-proofed sustainable development.


3.3 Data and statistical capacity building:
o “Integration of Statistical and Geospatial Informationfor Monitoring and Reporting of the Environmental Dimension of the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs ” focuses on building the capacity of countries to collect and access data and statistics to inform policy development as well as report and monitor progress on implementation.


3.4 Science, technology and innovation for the SDGs:
o “Coherent implementation of the environmental dimension of Sustainable Development Goals “. This project will support countries to develop national policies, plans or strategies that include multi-sectoral priorities and build technical capacity to deliver on the environmental dimension of the 2030 Agenda in a coordinated and integrated manner. It will also provide tools and support to national statistical offices so that they are able to collect and monitor data on relevant indicators. The project will promote South-South cooperation and facilitate sharing of experiences, best practices and opportunities for replication and scaling up.


3.5 Multi-stakeholder partnerships:
Working through UN Environment’s Major Groups and Stakeholders


3.7 Leveraging interlinkages across SDG goals and targets:
Yes we work on the nexus approach and integrated approaches

o The “Belt and Road Initiative” will work in provide support to several countries and is an example of a large scale partnership that encompasses interventions across multiple SDGs.


4.1 Supporting the intergovernmental body of your organization in contributing to the thematic review of the HLPF:
UN Environment contributed to the preparation of high-level political forum (HLPF) in 2016 and 2017, through the various reporting and institutional channels of inter-agency coordination These include the report of the respective reports of the Secretary-General and the process related to the Global Sustainable Development Report.

– Likewise, UN Environment supported the President and Bureau of the UN Environment Assembly, as well as the Committee of Permanent Representatives, in the preparation and consideration of the annual inputs of the intergovernmental body to the HLPF, which were sent in virtue of the invitation by the President of ECOSOC.


4.2 Contributing to policy/background briefs for the HLPF:
– Both the second (2016) and third (2017) sessions of the universal UN Environment Assembly undertook, at the ministerial level, the review and follow up of the environmental dimension of sustainable development under an integrated approach. For instance, the most recent session of the Environment Assembly was structure under the theme “Towards a Pollution-Free Planet” in a manner that its main outcomes, including the ministerial declaration and eleven resolutions adopted by consensus by all UN Member States, take into account the integrated nature of the 2010 Agenda and support the interlinkages with its 17 SDGs.

United nations Environment Assembly resolution 3/L.7 titled “Contributions of the United Nations Environment Assembly to the High-Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development” suggests measures to promote collaboration between UNEA and the HLPF. It also requests the Executive Director and recommends the President of the United Nations Environment Assembly to work closely with the President of the General Assembly and the President of the Economic and Social Council to enhance consideration of the annual contributions of the United Nations Environment Assembly in the work of the High-Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development.


4.4 Organizing side evens or speaking at the HLPF:
UN Environment has held side events and participated in them


4.5 Supporting VNR process:
An initiative that will provide support to countries developing Voluntary National Reviews (VNRs) has bee developed.


5. How has your organization cooperated with other UN system organizations to achieve coherence and synergies in the implementation of the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs? In this regard, has your organization launched or intend to launch any joint programmes or projects in collaboration with other UN entities? Are there any results or lessons you would like to highlight that might help improve the design and impact of such efforts? Has your organization participated in any of the following coordination systemwide mechanisms or any other relevant platform – CEB, UNDG, EC-ESA Plus, RCMs, UN-Energy, UN-Water, UN-Ocean, IAEG, IATT? Please specify which and indicate any suggestions you may have about improving collaborations within and across these mechanisms/platforms:
UN Environment participates in the UN System Chief Executives Board for Coordination (CEB), regional United Nations Development Group (UNDG) processes, Regional Coordination Mechanisms (RCM), Inter-agency and Expert Group on Sustainable Development Goal Indicators (IAEG-SDGs), UN- Ocean, UN-Water, and UN-Energy.


7. Has your organization organized any conferences, forums or events designed to facilitate exchange of experience, peer and mutual learning? If yes, please provide a brief summary below and include lessons learned and gaps identified based on the outcomes of these events. Please also include any events you plan to organize in the coming years.
Several workshops have been held. They include:

– The Integrated Approach: Strengthening Sustainability and Resilience in UN Country programming processes in the context of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. This was a pilot workshop to ‘road test’ updated presentations and learning materials for the integrated approach to strengthen sustainability and resilience in UN country programming processes, inclusive of: the UNDAF, One Programme, or other Delivering-as-One programmes at country level. The audience was UN Environment staff from different regional offices that service country-level initiatives.

– UNEP retreat on integrated approaches for the implementation at country and regional levels of the environmental dimension of the 2030 agenda for sustainable development. The retreat brought together some member states, members of the Committee of Permanent Representatives (CPR) to UNEP, non-state actors, and UNEP staff who use the integrated approach in different initiatives, with the aim to share experiences and inform the development of tools and methodologies. They explored characteristics of effective integrated approaches and how, through adaptation and innovation, the integrated approach can contribute to the transformation of our world through the 2030 Agenda.


8. Is there any other information you would like to share, including annual reports of your organization and any impact assessment or evaluation reports? If yes, please use the space below and attach the document(s). Please also use this space to provide any other information, comments or remarks you deem necessary:
UN Environment 2016 Annual Report

http://web.unep.org/annualreport/2016/index.php


9. In your view, what should a strategic plan for the UN system in support of the 2030 Agenda and SDGs look like? What key elements should it include and major challenges address in such a road map?
An effective coordination mechanism Transparency of agency/organization interventions to avoid duplication and identify possible synergies. Predictable sources of funding that avoids competition among agencies


10. Please indicate one or two endeavor or initiatives you suggest that the UN system organizations could undertake together to support the implementation of the SDGs between now and 2030:
Real time knowledge for effective decision making is a constant challenge. A knowledge management initiative that harnesses the best information from the system in a user friendly, externally facing platform.

WHO
World Health Organization

1. Since the adoption of the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs, has the governing body of your organization taken (or will it take) any decisions or new strategies to guide the implementation of the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs? If any, please provide a brief summary below, including the overarching vision of your organization.
Global Level

SDG-related World Health Assembly (WHA) resolutions:

2017

• WHA 70.5 – WHA70/2017/REC/1 – p.6

Programme Budget 2018-2019

• WHA 70.6 – WHA70/2017/REC/1 – p.8

Human resources for health and implementation of the outcomes of the United Nations’ High-Level Commission on Health Employment and Economic Growth.

• WHA70.14 – WHA70/2017/REC/1 – p.29

Strengthening immunization to achieve the goals of the global vaccine action plan

• WHA70.15 -WHA70/2017/REC/1 – p.33

Promoting the health of refugees and migrants

• WHA70.16 – WHA70/2017/REC/1 – p.34

Global vector control response: an integrated approach for the control of vector-borne diseases

2016

• WHA69.1 – WHA69/2016/REC/1 – p.3

Strengthening essential public health functions in support of the achievement of universal health coverage

• WHA69.2 – WHA69/2016/REC/1 – p.6

Committing to implementation of the Global Strategy for Women’s, Children’s and Adolescents’ Health

• WHA69.3 – WHA69/2016/REC/1 – p. 8

Global strategy and action plan on ageing and health 2016-2020: towards a world in which everyone can live a long and healthy life.

• WHA69.5 – WHA69/2016/REC/1 – p.18

WHO global plan of action to strengthen the role of the health system within a national multisectoral response to address interpersonal violence, in particular against women and girls, and against children

• WHA69.6 – WHA69/2016/REC/1 – p. 19

Prevention and control of noncommunicable diseases: responses to specific assignments in preparation for the third High-level Meeting of the United Nations General Assembly on the Prevention and Control of Non-communicable Diseases in 2018

• WHA69.7 – WHA69/2016/REC/1 – p.20

Addressing the challenges of the United Nations Decade of Action for Road Safety (2011-2020): outcome of the second Global High-level Conference on Road Safety – Time for Results

• WHA69.8 – WHA69/2016/REC/1 – p. 23

United Nations Decade of Action on Nutrition (2016-2025)1

• WHA69.9 – WHA69/2016/REC/1 – p. 25

Ending inappropriate promotion of foods for infants and young children

• WHA69.11 – WHA69/2016/REC/1 – p. 30

Health in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development1

• WHA69.20 – WHA69/2016/REC/1 – p. 47

Promoting innovation and access to quality, safe, efficacious and affordable medicines for children

• WHA69.22 – WHA69/2016/REC/1 – p. 52

Global health sector strategies on HIV, viral hepatitis and sexually transmitted infections, for the period 2016-20211

• WHA69.24 – WHA69/2016/REC/1 – p. 56

Strengthening integrated, people-centred health services

• WHA69.25 – WHA69/2016/REC/1 – p. 58

Addressing the global shortage of medicines and vaccines, and the safety and accessibility of children’s medication

2015

• WHA68.2 – WHA68/2015/REC/1 – p. 5

Global technical strategy and targets for malaria 2016-20301

• WHA68.6 – WHA68/2015/REC/1 – p. 14

Global vaccine action plan

• WHA68.7 – WHA68/2015/REC/1 – p. 17

Global action plan on antimicrobial resistance

• WHA68.8 – WHA68/2015/REC/1 – p. 20

Health and the environment: addressing the health impact of air pollution

Regional Level

• The Sustainable Health Agenda for the Americas 2018-2030 (SHAA2030) (39) was presented at the 29th Pan American Sanitary Conference in September 2017. SHAA2030 builds on the Pan American Health Organization’s (PAHO) Health Agenda for the Americas 2008-2017, unfinished business from the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), and the uniqueness of the 2030 Agenda. It represents the highest-level policy and strategic planning framework for the Region and serves as a call to action for Member States to work to achieve a healthier and more equitable Region of the Americas, as envisioned by the SDGs. This Agenda will be implemented through PAHO strategic plans and strategies, as well as through sub-regional and national health plans.

• The Regional Office for the Americas (AMRO/PAHO) is currently considering a Strategy and Roadmap developed to help guide Member States in implementing actions to realize the SDGs. Based on the key principles of equity and sustainability, the institutional strategy uses innovation and multi-sectoral approaches to incorporate other sectors as partners. The Roadmap will lead to better inter-programmatic collaboration and coordination between programs and the SDG targets they address, particularly those related to health. It will also help establish a unified regional response, optimize national and regional development efforts, and avoid duplication, waste and multiple reporting structures that place an undue burden on Member States. Ultimately, the Roadmap maintains a central focus on country needs and priorities, as opposed to a broad-brush regional approach, and will require Country Cooperation Strategies (CCSs) to include health and health-related SDG targets at the national level. This is in-keeping with the new global CCS Guidelines from the WHO.

• Executive staff, including AMRO’s Director, took part in the Regional Forum on Sustainable Development in April 2017 (Mexico), in which countries in the Americas took stock of the progress made on the SDGs. The Regional Forum has been set up by Member States of the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean to systematically monitor and report on progress and challenges concerning implementation of the SDGs.

• AMRO is currently conducting Regional consultations on its Strategy and Plan of Action on Health Promotion within the Context of the SDGs, which seeks to specifically align AMRO’s and the Region’s Health Promotion programming with the 2030 Agenda, both in terms of priorities and in terms of modes of multi-sectoral programming. This Strategy and Plan of Action incorporates four strategic lines of action explicitly focused on bringing together the tools of Health Promotion and the vision of the 2030 Agenda:

• Revitalizing the Healthy Settings Approach with a particular focus on local action

• Strengthening partnerships and participation through good governance

• Adopting health literacy for equity and empowerment

• Reorienting health services (prioritizing both UHC and determinants of health)

• In 2017, the WHO Regional Committee for Europe, at its 67th session endorsed the Roadmap to implement the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, building on Health 2020, the European policy for health and well-being. The roadmap aims to strengthen the capacities of Member States, to achieve better, more equitable, sustainable health and well-being for all at all ages in the WHO European Region. Achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) requires working in a transformative way in order to implement a set of coherent, evidence-informed policies that address health, well-being and all their determinants throughout the life-course and across all sectors of government and society. Revitalized global and regional partnerships are essential and will provide the essential support and momentum to this joint societal and global effort. This roadmap proposes five interdependent strategic directions: advancing governance and leadership for health and well-being; leaving no one behind; preventing disease and addressing health determinants by promoting multi- and intersectoral policies throughout the life-course; establishing healthy places, settings and resilient communities; and strengthening health systems for universal health coverage . It proposes four enabling measures to advance the implementation of both the 2030 Agenda and Health 2020: investment for health; multi-partner cooperation; health literacy, research and innovation; monitoring and evaluation.

• The WHO Regional Office for Europe (EURO) as a follow-up provides support to its Member States in partnership and promotes the progressive alignment of health and development policies or plans; the achievement of directly and indirectly health-related SDGs and their targets; the use of existing networks and platforms to ensure dialogue between organizations, sectors and countries; and the monitoring and evaluation of the implementation of the SDGs. Priorities for the Regional Office will include pursuing the implementation of both the 2030 Agenda and Health 2020 coherently in its work and with individual countries; technical support to countries; its contribution to coordination among United Nations agencies; stronger partnerships and initiatives at the regional and subregional levels; and evidence-informed monitoring and reporting.

• The 67th session of the WHO Regional Committee for the Western Pacific adopted resolution WPR/RC67.R5 on “Sustainable Development Goals” in October 2016, endorsing the Regional Action Agenda on Achieving the Sustainable Development Goals in the Western Pacific.

• The action agenda suggests options for Member States to consider in making the transition from the MDGs to the SDGs based on country-specific contexts, resources and entry points and related WHO support. It suggests practical actions to achieve the change in mindset that is needed for achieving the SDGs, including new ways of working that go beyond business as usual – and newer roles and capabilities for the health sector in working across government and stakeholders.

• The action agenda builds on and aligns with existing global and regional strategies, World Health Assembly and Regional Committee resolutions, as well as broader United Nations mandates and guidance. The regional action framework on Universal Health Coverage: Moving Towards Better Health (WPR/RC66.R2) provides the basis for country-wise development of UHC implementation roadmaps. UHC is the platform that brings together various health and development efforts.

• More recently, the SDGs have also informed further agenda items of the WHO Regional Committee for the Western Pacific and related regional frameworks in specific programme areas, for example on urban health (2015), health and the environment (2016), health promotion and the SDGs (2017) and law reform in the SDGs (2018, tbc). A progress item on the SDGs in follow up to WPR/RC67.R5 is also expected to be scheduled for 2018.

RD speech: http://www.euro.who.int/en/about-us/governance/regional-committee-for-europe/67th-session/speeches-and-presentations/presentations/presentation-roadmap-to-implement-the-2030agenda-for-sustainable-development,-building-on-health2020,-the-european-policy-for-health-and-well-being

• The Resolution: http://www.euro.who.int/__data/assets/pdf_file/0020/345602/67cd04e_Rev.1_SDGs_170629.pdf?ua=1

• The roadmap: http://www.euro.who.int/__data/assets/pdf_file/0008/345599/67wd09e_SDGroadmap_170638.pdf?ua=1



2.1 SDG-specific strategies, plans or work programmes
Global Level

• SDG-specific strategies, plans or work programmes:

o Global health sector strategy on HIV, 2016 2021 http://www.who.int/hiv/strategy2016-2021/ghss-hiv/en/

o Global health sector strategy on viral hepatitis, 2016-2021 http://www.who.int/hepatitis/strategy2016-2021/ghss-hep/en/

o Prevent HIV, test and treat all – WHO support for country impact, Progress report 2016 http://www.who.int/hiv/pub/progressreports/2016-progress-report/en/

o HIV, Universal Health Coverage and the Post-2015 Development Agenda – Discussion paper prepared by HIV Department in 2014, informed the Global Health Sector Strategy on HIV.

o The WHO End Tuberculosis (TB) Strategy 2016-2035 is fully aligned with the related SDG Goal and target for ending epidemics, and operational guidance, and biennium work plans and targets are updated and aligned.

o The WHO Global Technical Strategy for Malaria 2016-2030 was adopted by the World Health Assembly in May 2015 and is aligned with the SDGs.

o WHO’s 4th global Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) report and 2nd high-level Global Partners Meeting were centered on mainstreaming NTDs within the SDG agenda, with particular attention to UHC.

o The 2018-2023 Special Programme on Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR) strategy launched in 2017, focuses on contributing to the achievement of SDGs by promoting research on infectious diseases of poverty and by supporting research capacity building in countries with highest needs.

• WHA70.16 – WHA70/2017/REC/1 – p.34: Global vector control response: an integrated approach for the control of vector-borne diseases

• WHA69.3 – WHA69/2016/REC/1 – p. 8: Global strategy and action plan on ageing and health 2016-2020: towards a world in which everyone can live a long and healthy life.

• WHA69.5 – WHA69/2016/REC/1 – p.18: WHO global plan of action to strengthen the role of the health system within a national multisectoral response to address interpersonal violence, in particular against women and girls, and against children

• WHA69.19 – WHA69/2016/REC/1 – p. 43: Global strategy on human resources for health: workforce 2030

• WHA69.22 – WHA69/2016/REC/1 – p. 52: Global health sector strategies on HIV, viral hepatitis and sexually transmitted infections, for the period 2016-20211

• WHA68.2 – WHA68/2015/REC/1 – p. 5: Global technical strategy and targets for malaria 2016-2030

• WHA68.6 – WHA68/2015/REC/1 – p. 14: Global vaccine action plan

• WHA68.7 – WHA68/2015/REC/1 – p. 17: Global action plan on antimicrobial resistance



2.2 Aligning the structure of the organization with the transformative features of the 2030 Agenda, including any challenges and lessons learned in doing so
Global Level

o WHO is undergoing transformational agenda following the election of the new Director General and in line with the new 13th General Programme of Work, to be adopted by the World Health Assembly in May 2018. The GPW13 is firmly based on the 2030 Agenda.

o For example, the HIV department has incorporated Hepatitis and included aligned indicators for both in the SDG reporting framework. The department is organized to strengthen its country impact function, and is developing measurement guidelines on incidence measurement to support SDG accountability in this area.

Regional Level

o Following a request from Member States, AMRO developed the document “Preparing the Region of the Americas to Achieve the Sustainable Development Goal on Health,” which initiated a cooperation exercise with Member States to compare and align SDG targets with current national health policies and programs, AMRO’s mandates and Strategic Plan 2014-2019, and the targets and indicators of the Health Agenda for the Americas 2008-2017.



2.3 Readjusting or updating results-based budgeting and management, including performance indicators:
Results-based budgeting and management will be undertaken in the context of the 13th General Programme of Work (GPW13). The HIV department has focused its reporting on the SDG indicators of incidence, and is developing measurement guidelines in this area to better report on the SDGs.

Regional Level

o AMRO has made an agreement with the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC) to monitor indicators under SDG 3 and other health-related indicators in the Region.



2.4 Action to enhance support to the principle of “leaving no one behind” and to integrated policy approaches:
Global Level

o Strategic guidance includes focus on communities at high risk and vulnerable groups; WHO high-level ministerial meeting in 2017 on ending TB focused on multisectoral approaches, integrated care, and leaving no one behind. Leaving No One Behind was the WHO theme for World TB Day 2017.

o Global Malaria Programme (GMP) launched a coverage gap analysis on World Malaria Day 2017 and is continuing work to better define the populations that are most vulnerable to malaria cases and deaths; and define a package of work to ensure that these populations have access to prevention, diagnosis and treatment for malaria.

o The HIV department has developed guidelines on target setting for key populations to strengthen the granularity of data. They have also launched new person-centered monitoring guidelines which address the SDG indicators on improved data, including disaggregation (SDG targets 17.18 and 17.19).

Regional Level

o AMRO has championed several initiatives designed to prioritize equity, the principle of “leaving no one behind”, and integrated policy approaches. AMRO was the first WHO Region to produce a Strategy and Road Map for Health in All Policies, an equity-focused initiative designed to support multi-sectoral approaches to the SDGs. AMRO is also the convening institution for the Equity Commission, a two-year project in which leading experts from the Region in equity, gender, ethnicity, and human rights are reviewing data and trends in health inequalities, aiming to produce a report in 2018 with key findings and recommendations for Member States to address these. Several other initiatives, including the Regional Strategy for Health Promotion, to be launched shortly, highlight opportunities for action that target population groups at risk of being “left behind”.

o WHO EURO:

o Is in the process of developing the equity health status report.

o Is developing the men’s health strategy.

o Has the endorsed women’s health strategy and the strategy on sexual and reproductive health and rights.



2.5 Others:
• Leadership:

o WHO Europe is in an advanced stage, as the European Policy Framework Health 2020, is already contributing to the SDG implementation. Current adjustments are ongoing in the development of national roadmaps, building on the European roadmap. 93% of European Member States adjusted their national health policies to Health 2020. Integrating equity, gender and human rights and addressing the social and environmental determinants of health into multisectoral work is an effort that WHO/EURO have undertaken since many years.

• Normative instruments:

o A number of normative instruments on climate, environment and health (e.g. air quality and noise guidelines) in coordination with WHO Headquarters (HQ) and coordinated or contributed to research and innovation on the social, economic and environmental determinants; and developed evidence-based policies for national or sub-national action. Mapping of WHO instruments.

• A mapping exercise of World Health Assembly, Regional Committee and other resolutions, strategies and action plans was conducted to assess the legal and policy instruments available to support the implementation of health-related SDG targets and goals. This exercise led to the creation of two databases (one related to SDG 3 targets and one focused on health in all other SDGs).

• Governance. Governance is also a cross-cutting issue of the SDG roadmap Health 2020 and SDG implementation is supported through four approaches: intersectoral action for health, whole-of-government, Health in All Policies, and governance for health, all of which are underpinned by a whole-of-society approach. These approaches focus on how best to engage key stakeholders, including communities, citizens and businesses in policy implementation, while maintaining a focus on health as a social, environmental, cultural and economic goal.

• Producing a resource kit for Member States. Following a request from Member States, EURO is developing a resource kit for Member States, building on material developed across the organization. This resource kit in particular should support the Member States in getting started, in integrating health and well-being into national and subnational development plans, support to implementation, monitoring and evaluation.

• SDG health targets factsheets. SDG factsheets have been created to synthesize the evidence-base on key health targets in order to promote coherence and better address the burden of disease throughout the Region. Currently, SDG factsheets have been produced on communicable and noncommunicable disease (NCD), climate change, road safety, vaccine coverage, antimicrobial resistance, essential medicines, hazardous chemicals, sexual and reproductive health services, mental health, maternal health, child and adolescent health and migration and health and others are under development. It was agreed that these factsheets present important information and should be included in the technical annex.

• In line with the Regional Action Agenda on Achieving the Sustainable Development Goals in the Western Pacific, there has been strong commitment and senior management leadership to facilitate the mindset change implied by the SDGs also within the WHO Western Pacific Region. For example, the SDGs were the topic of two Consultations of WHO Representatives and Country Liaison Officers in the Western Pacific Region (April and November 2016).

• The SDGs and UHC also call for stronger coordination and collaboration across different health programme areas and teams. WPRO has set up two cross-divisional working groups to foster collaboration on (1) MDG/SDGs and (2) Gender and Social Determinants.

• The medium-term strategic vision for cooperation between WHO and individual countries is represented in the WHO country cooperation strategies (CCS). All CCSs developed in the Western Pacific Region since 2016 have explicitly recognized the importance of the SDGs, and the SDGs have been specifically considered during the formulation of the strategic priorities with each country.

• Formulation of the two year programme of collaboration with countries, identifying specific activities that WHO will support during that period, are then formulated taking into account the priorities of the CCS.



3.1 Mainstreaming the SDGs in development plans and policies or through national sustainable development plans/strategies:
Regional Level

o As described above, the document “Preparing the Region of the Americas to Achieve the Sustainable Development Goal on Health” supports countries in mainstreaming the SDGs in national development plans and policies. A series of national consultations have taken place, both virtually and in-person, to integrate.

o Thirty European countries have requested some sort of support. This ranges from integrating the SDGs into national health plans, including health into the VNRs, supporting the integration of health into national development plans, assessing investment for health, and integrating health into sectoral policies and interventions. A series of national consultations have taken place, from country missions to policy dialogue and high level presidential meetings.



3.2 Mainstreaming the SDGs in sectoral strategies, including specific SDG/target strategies:
Global Level

o WHO provides support to countries to develop their health sector strategies and disease specific programme strategies. The CDS cluster has supported many countries to address SDG 3.3 within the context of UHC (SDG 3.8).

o WHO has moved towards HIV Treat All guidelines consistent with universal coverage and ending AIDS.

Regional Level

• The document “Preparing the Region of the Americas to Achieve the Sustainable Development Goal on Health” focuses largely on health sector strategies to achieve SDG 3.



3.3 Data and statistical capacity building:
Global Level

o The Global Malaria Programme (GMP) is working with colleagues in Health Systems Strengthening (HSS) on developing a malaria module for DHIS2 and to provide capacity building for high priority countries which is not only strengthen malaria reporting, but also data reporting for health in general.

o HIV is also developing a DHIS 2 module to allow improved disaggregated reporting. HIV has also launched its person centered monitoring guidelines, to strengthen disaggregated data.

Regional level

o Developing a common set of indicators for the joint monitoring framework for SDGs, Health 2020 and the Global NCD Action Plan (2017) In order to address concerns raised by Member States on the burden of reporting to WHO and other international bodies, Member States at the 67th session of the Regional Committee for Europe (RC67) agreed to adopt a joint monitoring framework for reporting on indicators for the Sustainable Development Goals, Health 2020 and the Global Action Plan for the Prevention and Control of Noncommunicable Diseases through the endorsement of resolution EUR/RC67/R3 in September 2017. The first step towards the development of a joint monitoring framework was to establish an expert group that would identify a common set of indicators for the joint monitoring framework. That group met in Vienna, Austria, on 20-21 November 2017. This report provides a summary of that meeting, including the process of deliberation and resulting recommendations.



3.4 Science, technology and innovation for the SDGs:
Global Level

o GMP works closely with the WHO Global Observatory on Health Research and Development and with product development partners to ensure an efficient process to review and recommend new malaria tools and strategy based on high quality evidence review.



3.5 Multi-stakeholder partnerships:
Global Level

o GMP works with the Roll Back Malaria Partnership which is coordinating malaria partners from multiple sectors on joint efforts to maintain high political commitment, resource mobilization and integrate work across multi-sectors at the regional and global levels.

o HIV works directly with civil society and UNAIDS in coordinated a multi stakeholder response at country level, in 2018 this has involved joint country envelopes and budgeting across the UN.

Regional Level

• Multi-stakeholder partnerships:

o In 2018, AMRO will roll out a Region-specific capacity-building program to support Member States in adapting Health in All Policies approaches, with a strong focus on multi-stakeholder partnerships and including references to the Sustainable Development Goals.

o A strong effort is on partnership: In the WHO European Region, the UN Issue-based Coalition on Health and Well-being for All at All Ages has identified four workstreams for collaboration with other UN agencies to support health-related SDG attainment: maternal and child health; tuberculosis, HIV and viral hepatitis; medicines; and migration.

o WHO/Euro also serves member States through the provision of secretariat services, jointly with the The United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE), to the Protocol on Water and Health, the Transport, Health and Environment Pan-European Programme (THE PEP) and the chairing of the Task force on Health of the UN Convention on Long Range Transboundary Air Pollution.

o The South Eastern European Health Network (SEEHN) is an inter-country mechanism through which to promote SDG implementation related to health throughout nine of the Region’s Member States. To this end, the 2017 Chisinau Pledge re-enforced country commitments to achieving the SDGs and UHC in addition to identifying emergencies, health workforce and population ageing as policy areas that can be addressed through cross-border work, with the potential to focus these efforts sub-nationally as well. The Small country initiative has started to support the implementation of the SDGs and is in their annual meetings discussing concerted action.

o Additional platforms for promoting health and well-being across the European Region include the Regional Platform for Working Together for Better Health and Well-Being for All and the European Action Plan for Strengthening Public Health Capacities and Services.

o The Environment and Health Process provides a mandate and platform for WHO engagement at this intersection, with the Ostrava Declaration articulating seven public health priorities for environment and health across the European Region, including: improving air quality for all; ensuring access to safe drinking water, sanitation and hygiene for all; minimizing the adverse effects of chemicals; preventing and eliminating the adverse effects of waste management and contaminated sites; strengthening adaptation to and mitigation of climate change; supporting cities and regions to become healthier; and building the environmental sustainability of health systems.



3.6 Sub-national plans/strategies and implementation for the SDGs:
Global Level

o Sub-national plans or micro-focus plans are in development for countries pursuing malaria elimination.

Regional Level

o WHO has two specific networks targeting the subnational level: the Regions for Health Network (RHN) and the European Healthy Cities Network. RHN is currently comprised of 32 regions. In addition to facilitating peer-to-peer learning across regions, RHN produces publications to share knowledge and best practices, undertakes capacity building activities, gives voice and provides direct exposure to key stakeholders at the sub-national level, and supports communications activities to enhance awareness and visibility on the ground. The European Healthy Cities Network currently consists of 1,400 cities in 30 countries, with 96 WHO flagship-designated cities in total. The Network was founded in 1988 and is preparing to enter its seventh phase, which will be aligned with the 2030 Agenda and guided by the five ‘Ps’ of sustainable development plus one : people, planet, peace, prosperity, and participation + place. The network is also preparing for its first political summit of mayors to be held in Copenhagen in February 2018. Together, these networks expand the entry points available to WHO in countries.

o In particular, Wales has become an exemplar of SDG localization through the passage and implementation of the Well-being of Future Generations Act, adopted in 2015. In particular, the Welsh case demonstrates the importance of extensive consultation, including over 6,500 individuals, at the local level in order to fully embed and engender a sense of ownership over health-related SDG attainment on the ground. The Welsh strategy is organized around seven well-being goals (a globally responsible, prosperous, resilient, healthier, and more equal Wales with more cohesive communities and vibrant culture and thriving Welsh Language) and five ways of working, including a focus on the long-term, prevention, integration, collaboration and involvement. To assist with implementation, the development of a Health and Sustainability Hub is underway along with a toolkit to support Sustainability Improvement for Teams (SIFT), which is being developed to support the five ways of working through a participatory, iterative development process.

o Some key examples in AMRO include:

o Chile: In order to implement the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs, Chile has worked to ensure that the Goals are well integrated into national policies and plans. For example, Chile has developed a National Council comprised of the Minister of External Affairs, Minister of Tourism, Minister of Social Development and Minister of the Environment. Currently, the Council is completing a national analysis on the 17 SDGs and actions needed to achieve them. The analysis includes progress, areas for improvement and challenges.

o Costa Rica: Since 2015, Costa Rica has made significant efforts to articulate a multidimensional approach to the implementation of SDGs. In 2016, Costa Rica became the first country to sign a “National Pact for the Achievement of Sustainable Development Goals,” representing a fundamental consensus to ‘leave no one behind’. Signatories included representatives from three government branches, civil society organizations, faith based organizations, public universities, local governments and the business sector.

o Jamaica: In Jamaica, the adoption of the Agenda has resulted in a review of national development processes in order to maximize synergies between the global agenda and Jamaica’s national development plan, “Vision 2030 Jamaica – National Development Plan”, adopted in 2009. Vision 2030, Jamaica’s first long-term development plan, provides a strategic road map to prepare the country for achieving developed country status by 2030. The plan aims to foster sustainable prosperity by creating conditions in which the country’s productive enterprises are able to generate greater levels of wealth and in which the social and environmental conditions and the general well-being of the society are enhanced.

o Peru: In September 2016, Peru began updating national policies, incorporating the guidelines of the 2030 Agenda within sector-specific policies and plans. In October 2016, the first official exercise was carried out to better align sectoral policies with the aims and parameters of Agenda 2030. Peru has also worked to strengthen multilevel governmental coordination, targeting sub-national policies with a territorial approach.



3.7 Leveraging interlinkages across SDG goals and targets:
Global Level

o All of the above, in collaboration with all levels of the organization and with partners. Strategic support at country level on all inputs above; Contributions at regional meetings on end TB/SDG targets as well as broader SDG meetings; annual End TB Strategy Summit with 30 highest burden countries to monitor and support their annual actions in implementation, and high level political meeting in 2017 with 120 leaders from ministries and 1000 participants; and support for the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) planning for high-level meeting in 2018.

o In Data HIV, TB and malaria have worked together to strengthen disaggregated data to support the SDG data targets 17.18 and 17.19.

Regional Level

o AMRO’s extensive activity in support of the Health in All Policies approach, including several capacity-building workshops, an organizational Strategy, Road Map, Concept Note, published Case Studies and internal reporting highlights key opportunities for multi-sectoral work across SDG goals and targets. Of particular note is the Strategy and Plan of Action on Health Promotion in the Context of the SDGs.

o EURO’s extensive activity in support of the Health in All Policies approach, including several capacity-building workshops, an organizational Strategy, Road Map, Concept Note, published Case Studies and internal reporting highlights key opportunities for multi-sectoral work across SDG goals and targets. Of particular note is the Strategy and Plan of Action on Health Promotion in the Context of the SDGs.

• WHO regularly supports normative, analytical, technical assistance or capacity building to countries in the implementation of the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs.

• Since its endorsement in late 2016, the Regional Action Agenda on Achieving the Sustainable Development Goals in the Western Pacific has provided a basis to support Member States in prioritization and implementation of the health-related SDGs. Initial priorities for WHO support and engagement included:

o Country and regional monitoring of progress towards UHC and other SDG targets: WPRO has developed a UHC and SDG M&E framework for the Western Pacific Region (as an annex to the regional action agenda) as well as a baseline report and technical guidance.

o Integrating an equity focus in health programmes, including equity-focused service delivery models and strategic approaches. For example, through collaboration across programmes and offices, WPRO developed a report on advancing health through attention to gender, equity and human rights in 2016-2017.

o Strengthened partnerships for multi-sectoral and multi-stakeholder action that leaves no-one behind, including health in all policies (HiAP) approaches. For example, WHO collaborated with the Government of South Australia in 2017 on a global conference and case study book on progressing the SDGs through HiAP.



3.8 Others:
National Health Policies: National health policies (NHPs) are a vehicle for enhancing leadership and channeling political support of transformative change for health and well-being for all at all ages. NHPs facilitate the implementation of binding agreements and commitments as well as the diffusion of global and regional policy frameworks related to health and well-being. They also help countries to manage change effectively, set priorities and tailor implementation strategies to their unique country environments. As a result, NHPs play an important role in enhancing policy coherence across agencies, sectors, levels and technical areas in support of both Health 2020 and 2030 Agenda. Policy dialogues, sound monitoring and evaluation frameworks, and also independent policy review are currently ongoing.


4.2 Contributing to policy/background briefs for the HLPF:
Regional Level

• Contributing to policy/background briefs for the HLPF:

o Three Member States from the Region (Mexico, Venezuela, Colombia) presented voluntary reviews to the High-Level Political Forum in 2016 and 11 (Argentina, Belize, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Panama, Peru, Uruguay) in 2017. AMRO supported these countries in preparing their reviews.

o Nine Member States from the EUR Region presented voluntary reviews to the High-Level Political Forum in 2016 and 13 in 2017. Thirteen countries are planned in 2018 (see Figure). WHO Euro supported its MS through a range of activities a. review of the Voluntary National Reviews (VNRs), b. organization of stakeholder and policy dialogue c. expert contributions to specific subjects, d. contribution to MAPS missions in the development or revisions of VNRs or strategies and e. through multicounty dialogues.

o In cooperation of the Ministries of Health events were organized in a range of countries, and are foreseen in 2018 for a range of countries (Romania, Belarus, Poland, Iceland, etc).



4.3 Helping organize SDG-specific events in the preparatory process:
Yes


4.4 Organizing side evens or speaking at the HLPF:
Yes


4.5 Supporting VNR process:
Regional Level

o AMRO was part of the inter-agency group that supported countries in the VNR process.

o EURO was part of the inter-agency group that supported countries in the VNR process.

• At the regional level, WPRO and SEARO have collaborated with UN partners on the organization of a side event on health at the 2017 Asia-Pacific Forum on Sustainable Development (APFSD 2017).

• At the country level, WHO has regularly engaged with national counterparts as well as UN and other partners in the localization of the SDGs and related alignments of workplans. For example, WHO has supported subnational health system strengthening in Mongolia with a focus on “Leaving No One Behind”, in order to help Mongolia with reaching Universal Health Coverage and its Sustainable Development Vision 2030. In the Philippines, WHO supported technical consultation on the SDG 6 indicators for WASH.

• WHO has been active in many countries supporting preparations for the HLPF (particularly the VNRs) and related SDG-specific activities. For example, in Malaysia, WHO together with other UN agencies supported preparation of the VNR in 2016.



5. How has your organization cooperated with other UN system organizations to achieve coherence and synergies in the implementation of the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs? In this regard, has your organization launched or intend to launch any joint programmes or projects in collaboration with other UN entities? Are there any results or lessons you would like to highlight that might help improve the design and impact of such efforts? Has your organization participated in any of the following coordination systemwide mechanisms or any other relevant platform – CEB, UNDG, EC-ESA Plus, RCMs, UN-Energy, UN-Water, UN-Ocean, IAEG, IATT? Please specify which and indicate any suggestions you may have about improving collaborations within and across these mechanisms/platforms:
• TB Department collaborating actively with UNICEF, UNAIDS, ILO, UNHCR, IOM on specific interventions and overall multisectoral collaboration towards ending epidemics, supporting vulnerable groups (including children, workers, refugees and migrants).

• Global Malaria Programme (GMP) is working with UNOPs on the implementation of two work streams funded by the Global Fund to support the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS) to achieve malaria elimination: Monitoring antimalarial drug efficacy and resistance in the GMS; and Malaria Elimination Database for the GMS.

• The HIV Department collaborates and has launched joint country envelopes and planning with UNAIDS, UNICEF and across the United Nations.

• Roll-out of new treatments for children with tuberculosis, who face great challenges in diagnosis and treatment; screening and continuity of care for TB patients, following WHO updated guidance and tools, among migrants served by IOM Key lesson: ensure rapid transfer of information on guidance and best practice; and participation in meetings of other UN agencies on regular basis.

• The malaria grants just started in 2018 – no.

• The HIV Department move towards Treat All has pushed for universal health coverage and simplified delivery to achieve the SDG impact, however additional efforts are required for key populations so no one is left behind.

• Contributions made to inter-agency efforts on Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) Interagency Coordination Group on Antimicrobial Resistance (IACG).

Regional Level

• AMRO has collaborated extensively with Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC) (examples listed above) to identify and act on shared priorities and reporting mechanisms, avoiding undue burden on countries while maximizing the impact of 2030 Agenda-oriented programming.

• Executive staff, including EUROs Regional Director, was part of the high level panel, and took part in the Regional Forum on Sustainable Development in April 2017 (Geneva), in which countries in the European Region took stock of the progress made on the SDGs. The Regional Forum has been set up by Member States of the Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) to systematically monitor and report on progress and challenges concerning implementation of the SDGs.

• Executive staff and senior staff participated to the Regional Director Coordination meeting, which is held twice a year. Major discussions occur on the SDG implementation in countries of the European Region to align agendas of the UN agencies and also prepare for the new UNDAFs.

• In the WHO European Region, the UN Issue-based Coalition on Health and Well-being for All at All Ages is coordinated by EURO. It has identified four work-streams for collaboration with other UN agencies to support health-related SDG attainment: maternal and child health; tuberculosis, HIV and viral hepatitis; medicines; and migration.

• The SDGs have underlined the importance of partnerships across the UN system as well as other development actors and stakeholders. At the regional level, WPRO regularly collaborates with UN and other partners, both in specific programme areas as well as more broadly with regards to cross-cutting agendas related to the SDGs (e.g. UNDG Asia-Pacific (AP) network).

• At the country level, WHO is an active member of the UN country team and contributes to the advocacy for, implementation and localisation of the SDG agenda.

• WHO South Pacific representative office has been engaged in developing monitoring and evaluation process for UN Pacific Strategy 2018 – 22. While having participated, WHO has provided technical input on how to maximise the use of health related indicators that are from SDGs. WHO has led discussion on the Healthy Islands Monitoring Framework which is to trace progress against the Healthy Islands vision. This framework helps Pacific island countries and areas enhance data generation capability for health related SDGs as it follows a number of substantial health indicators.

• WHO participates in the UNDG-AP, and one key aspect of this is to review the performance of senior UN management at country level, specifically endeavouring to ensure that the RCs and UNCTs are functioning effectively and with good collaboration/cooperation, and that relevant agency heads are contributing accordingly.



6. How has your organization engaged with stakeholder groups, both in supporting implementation at the country, regional and global levels, and within your own organization? If yes, please provide main highlights, including any lessons learned:
Global Level

• Key lesson: great value in expanding engagement of civil society organizations and key affected persons, and enabling their participation in planning, monitoring, implementation efforts at all levels.

• Yes, WHO works closely with Member States and their implementing partners to support the development of national malaria strategic plans, malaria programme reviews, strengthening work on vector control, surveillance and elimination. Coordinating with other stakeholders is critically important to ensure the support given to countries is aligned and not duplicative and requires significant effort.

Regional Level

• AMRO’s strategic planning and programming under the 2030 Agenda has been formulated largely in response to Member State requests for specific guidance. One highlight has been ensuring that new or revised strategies and initiatives incorporate significant elements of the 2030 Agenda, such as the Strategy and Plan of Action on Health Promotion within the Context of the Sustainable Development Goals (currently under a formalized process of consultation with Member States and other stakeholders through a series of virtual meetings).

• Among efforts to shift the global community’s attention to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development is a five-year interagency collaboration (2016-2021) between PAHO and the Organization of American States (OAS). This timely partnership aims to identify preliminary joint actions between the two agencies to guide and support Member States in the implementation and achievement of the SDGs, especially those goals outside the scope of the health sector. The first publication of this strategic alliance aligns each SDG with existing mandates and interagency collaborations, in order to identify existing means and mechanisms that will facilitate the translation of the 2030 Agenda’s theories of equity and multisectoral collaboration into policies and processes that can generate positive outcomes for all. Beyond supporting national and regional action, the mapping aims to simplify coordination and reporting efforts on the part of national governments striving to achieve objectives under multiple international frameworks, and to more closely align the Inter-American and United Nations systems.

• EURO’s strategic planning and programming under the 2030 Agenda has been formulated largely in response to Member State requests for specific guidance. Numerous of the EURO committal documents in 2017 and forthcoming in 2018, have been developed in light of the Agenda 2030 implementation. The EURO roadmap has been discussed by the major stakeholders in its preparations and across agencies.

• The Regional Action Agenda on Achieving the Sustainable Development Goals in the Western Pacific also stresses the importance of engaging and working with a broader range of stakeholders, including parliamentary bodies and local and city governments, including mayors.

• WPRO has strengthened its collaboration with Parliamentarians through the Asia-Pacific Parliamentarian Forum on Global Health (established in 2015). The forum’s second meeting in Seoul on 24-25 November 2016 focused on the SDGs and resulted in the adoption of the Seoul Declaration, stressing parliamentarian’s essential role in advancing health in the SDGs through enacting legislation, approving budgets and mobilizing resources, providing oversight to ensure government accountability and transparency, ensuring national implementation of global commitments, and fostering political constituencies.

• The Western Pacific Region also has a long history of collaborating with local and city governments, for example through the healthy cities and healthy islands movements. The central place of cities and communities was most recently recognized in the Shanghai Consensus on Healthy Cities (2016), adopted by more than 100 mayors at the 9th Global Conference on Health Promotion.

• Senior WPRO staff regularly promote the SDGs and work towards them through keynote addresses at major Regional, country-level and international conferences (e.g. the Asia Pacific Academic Consortium for Public Health meeting (Seoul), the Asia Pacific Public Health Conference (Malaysia) and the Japan Society for international Health.

• WHO South Pacific representative office has supported Fiji, Kiribati and Tonga to attend 1st and 2nd UHC Technical Advisory Group (TAG) meeting with in-country experience in expanding health service coverage and enhancing health finance. The office also convened a subregional consultation meeting: to share evidence and best practice of health system strengthening; to discuss the current gaps in health service delivery; and to articulate recommendations for achieving Healthy Islands vision with regard to UHC.

• In Malaysia, WHO together with other UN agencies supported Government in the preparation of the national SDG roadmap including engagement of civil society and the private sector through a consultative process.



7. Has your organization organized any conferences, forums or events designed to facilitate exchange of experience, peer and mutual learning? If yes, please provide a brief summary below and include lessons learned and gaps identified based on the outcomes of these events. Please also include any events you plan to organize in the coming years.
Global Level

• WHO ministerial level meeting in 2017 on ending TB gained substantially from the intensive efforts to secure participation from ministers within and beyond health at high number (120 countries represented), with host country (Russian Federation) present at head of state level and financially supporting), explicit linkage to United Nations Secretary General/United Nations General Assemby (UNSG/UNGA) efforts, and large range of international and regional agencies, stakeholders involved. Has shown impact in accelerating explicit high-level planning and target setting.

• GMP convenes the 21 E2020 malaria eliminating countries forum annually. The first form was held in 2017.

• WHO Neglected Tropical Diseases department convened its 2nd high-level Global Partners Meeting (19 April, Geneva, Switzerland) which focused on mainstreaming NTDs within the SDG agenda, with particular attention to UHC.

• WHO HIV Department has convened regional capacity building workshops on implementing Treat All towards the SDG goals and universal health coverage. These highlighted the challenges and special efforts needed to reach key populations, so no one is left behind.

Regional Level

• To ensure that PAHO’s SDG-related activities are fully grounded in national and Regional priorities and circumstances, a series of national consultations have taken place both virtually and in-person. A regional workshop was held in Medellin, Colombia in November 2015 to enhance the capacities of PAHO Member States’ country offices, health ministries, and other public institutions involved with the implementation of 2030 Agenda in the Americas. Approximately 50 technical officers participated, representing about 20 countries of the region. These consultations provided an opportunity for dialogue between PAHO and country representatives on programmatic and technical resources for the implementation of 2030 Agenda with a health lens; a platform to share and cross-reference national experiences in achieving SDG targets related directly or indirectly to health; and a recognition of the need for an integrated, multisectoral strategy to address health inequities, such as HiAP. In addition, PAHO has been working with several institutions in the Region to strengthen country capacity on the actual implementation of the SDGs across the region. A case in point is PAHO’s collaboration with the Sustainable Development Solution Network and Fundação Oswaldo Cruz (FIOCRUZ), a Collaborating Center in Brazil, described below.

• In September 2015, a meeting of PAHO Collaborating Centers was held that was focused on environmental health strategy, with strong links to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its significance to research in this field going forward. Since then, PAHO has developed and circulated an advanced draft of the document “Measuring Progress on Environmental Health through the Sustainable Development Goals”, following a workshop to discuss environmental health indicators related to the SDGs. Several country profiles are now being prepared for countries throughout the Region, including Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Colombia and the United States.

• Numerous events and conferences have been organized in EURO. An exhaustive list with web links can be found here:

o Cross-sectoral toolkit to guide Member States along SDG roadmap 25-01-2018

A technical meeting successfully advanced the development of a toolkit for Member States that will guide activities towards achieving health, equity and well-being for all at all ages within the framework of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The 2-day meeting took place in Copenhagen, Denmark, on 18-19 January 2018.

10th European Public Health Conference: subnational actors and small states come together to promote resilient and healthy communities 19-01-2018

A series of workshops organized by the WHO Regions for Health Network (RHN) during the 10th European Public Health Conference, “Sustaining resilient and healthy communities”, Stockholm, Sweden, 1-4 November 2017, provided actors from the subnational level and small countries a platform for addressing current health affairs from their unique perspectives. Topics, such as integration-for-health systems, transformative health promotion and gender stereotypes, the Sustainable Development Goals and urban environments, were tackled in the light of the challenges and opportunities specific to subnational actors and small states.

Implementing the 2030 Agenda: case studies from the Regions for Health Network15-01-2018

As part of its role to support the Member States, the WHO Regions for Health Network (RHN) has identified best practice and relevant experience, which can boost the implementation of the United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development (2015). This information was recently compiled in a new publication entitled “Sustainable development in Wales and other regions in Europe – achieving health and equity for present and future generations”.

WHO supports Romania’s integration of health in sustainable development 29-12-2017

On 12 November 2017, WHO organized the first multistakeholder meeting in Bucharest, Romania, to create a shared vision of health within the context of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Participants discussed ways to achieve health and well-being for all at all ages as part of the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). This is in line with the 2030 Agenda, which calls for involving different sectors and stakeholders in actions aimed at sustainable development.

Turkmenistan to move faster towards sustainable development with United Nations support 13-12-2017 WHO along with other United Nations agencies and the World Bank conducted an assessment visit to Turkmenistan to support the country in making more effective steps towards achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Annual regional meeting focuses on tobacco taxation and policy coherence12-12-2017

Representatives of over 40 countries gathered in Heidelberg, Germany, for the annual European regional meeting on the implementation of the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) on 30 November-1 December 2017. The meeting focused on two key topics in the context of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs): tobacco taxation and policy coherence in tobacco control.

Have your say: take the WHO United Nations (UN) consultation survey and contribute to the UN’s work to end tuberculosis, HIV and viral hepatitis in the WHO European Region11-12-2017

If you are a member of a civil society organization or a national or international partner organization, a patient, or part of an affected community, or if you simply have strong opinions you would like to share to contribute to the UN’s work to end tuberculosis (TB), HIV and viral hepatitis in the Region, WHO/Europe wants to hear from you.

Living longer, healthier lives – working towards integrated, people-centred care for older persons 29-09-2017

Health-care systems must serve all people at all ages and leave no one behind – this idea is embedded in the core vision of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. As the world marks International Day of Older Persons on 1 October, WHO will launch new guidelines on integrated care for older people (ICOPE) to support the work of Member States towards creating more integrated, person-centred health and long-term care for people at all ages.

Endemic measles interrupted in 42 out of 53 countries in the Region26-09-2017

The number of countries in the Region that have demonstrated interruption of measles and rubella continues to increase and now stands at 42 for measles and 37 for rubella. However, Dr Zsuzsanna Jakab, WHO Regional Director for Europe, warns that immunization coverage is decreasing. 1 in every 15 children still does not receive the first vaccination dose against measles and rubella on time.

European leaders set new roadmap to achieve 2030 Agenda and improve 900 million people’s health and well-being07-09-2017

Health leaders gather at the annual meeting of the WHO Regional Committee for Europe. In Budapest, Hungary on 11-14 September 2017 they will take decisions on health priorities that will have an impact on the health and well-being of about 900 million people in the WHO European Region, including in the European Union, central and eastern Europe, the Caucasus and central Asia.

Regional Committee: making decisions on key health priorities for the European Region 29-08-2017

On 11 September 2017 in Budapest, Hungary, health ministers and high-level representatives of the 53 Member States of the WHO European Region, along with partner organizations and civil society, will gather for the annual WHO Regional Committee for Europe. The committees provide an opportunity to discuss and make decisions related to key health priorities in the Region. In this year’s 67th session, and in alignment with the Health 2020 policy framework and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, participants will consider topics ranging from building a sustainable health workforce to improving the environment and health.

Health sector leading the way on adapting SDGs in Kyrgyzstan08-06-2017

With support from WHO and other development partners, the Ministry of Health of Kyrgyzstan has become an active leader in setting priorities and adapting the SDGs to make implementation possible at the national level.

Better future: Health for all, all for health 19-05-2017

In September 2015, heads of state and government adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The United Nations emphasizes that everyone needs to play their part if the SDGs are to be reached: governments, the private sector and civil society. The 17 SDGs and their 169 associated targets are global in nature, universally applicable and interlinked. Health has a central place as a major contributor and beneficiary of sustainable development policies. SDG 3, “Health and well-being for all”, is strengthened by the 13 health targets, and additional health-related targets are set out under other goals.

Reducing the SDG reporting burden: WHO/Europe’s initiative presented at the Regional Forum on Sustainable Development 09-05-2017

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development underscores the importance of “quality, accessible, timely and reliable disaggregated data … to help with the measurement of progress and to ensure that no one is left behind” (Paragraph 48). Improving the collection, coordination, analysis and dissemination of data and building statistical capacities for monitoring progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) remain significant challenges for all countries in the WHO European Region and beyond.

WHO Regional Director for Europe highlights key health aspects for SDG implementation at the first Regional Forum on Sustainable Development 03-05-2017

The first Regional Forum on Sustainable Development for the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) Region took place in Geneva on 25 April 2017. The meeting was intended to follow up on and review progress towards the implementation of the 2030 Agenda and its Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in the region. The Forum, which will be held annually, is designed to provide input from the UNECE region to the High-Level Political Forum (HLPF), which oversees follow-up and review processes at the global level.

WHO European Healthy Cities Network adopts the Pécs Declaration14-03-2017

The WHO European Healthy Cities Network Annual Conference drew to a close on Friday 3 March, with mayors and political leaders adopting the 2017 Healthy Cities Pécs Declaration. This reconfirms their commitment to creating inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable societies.

First meeting of the Health and SDGs Expert Working Group provides input to roadmap for healthand sustainable development in the Region25-01-2017

In 2016, countries of the WHO European Region recognized that the Health 2020 policy framework and related World Health Assembly and Regional Committee resolutions provide a strong foundation upon which to position health at the centre of initiatives to implement the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and achieve its Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The WHO Regional Committee for Europe also endorsed the development of a roadmap to support countries in this endeavour.

Kick-off meeting of UN European coalition on health identifies 4 workstreams for joint action13-01-2017

The UN European coalition on health is a coordination mechanism focusing on the achievement of SDG 3 – to ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages – in the pan-European Region, and of the health-related targets present in other SDGs.

Communicating health and the Sustainable Development Goals: experiences from small countries of the WHO European Region01-11-2016

One of the 4 key action areas of WHO/Europe’s small countries initiative is to support the implementation of Health 2020 by better engaging the media as a partner. Collaborating with the media to raise awareness of health issues, goals and targets is also critical to the implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, which calls for the involvement of civil society, the private sector and individuals from every country in order to hold governments accountable and ensure progress.

Ministers endorse joint statement on climate change and health at high-level meeting of small countries12-10-2016

Today, health ministers and policy-makers from eight European countries endorsed a statement that commits them to joining efforts in protecting people’s health from adverse effects of climate change. The Third High-level Meeting of Small Countries, which includes WHO European countries with a population of less than one million, took place in Monaco on 11-12 October 2016 to strengthen collaboration in tackling today’s complex health challenges.

New European platform for partnerships across sectors, United Nations agencies and civil society 13-12-2016

The second day of the high-level conference Working together for better health and well-being focused on how to implement intersectoral and cross-governmental policies. A common observation among delegates was the need to identify and communicate co-benefits for sectors other than health in order to generate effective, sustainable partnerships. They agreed to establish a new platform to improve and implement collaboration.

• The development of the action agenda was informed by a Member States meeting on achieving the SDGs in the Western Pacific in June 2016. Among other events, SDGs were the overarching focus at:

o The 9th Global Conference on Health Promotion, Shanghai, 21-24 November 2016 – resulted in the Shanghai Declaration on promoting health in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

o The Asia-Pacific Parliamentarian Forum on Global Health, Seoul, 24-25 November 2016 – resulted in the Seoul Declaration (see also above).

o The 2nd Regional Forum on WHO Collaborating Centres, 28-29 November 2016

o A global conference on Health in all Policies and the SDGs, Adelaide, 30-31 March 2017 – resulted in the Adelaide Statement II

 A technical workshop on Indicators, Data & Methods for Monitoring SDG & UHC, 24-26 May 2017

• In follow up to the regional action framework on Universal Health Coverage: Moving Towards Better Health (WPR/RC66.R2), the WHO Regional Office for the Western Pacific established a Universal Health Coverage Technical Advisory Group (UHC TAG) to review progress and provide advice to WHO and Member States on how to advance UHC in the Western Pacific Region. The UHC TAG meets annually in Manila; its third meeting is scheduled for November 2018.

• The theme of World Health Day 2018, celebrated on 7 April, will be “universal health coverage”, providing an opportunity to raise awareness, review progress, and strengthen commitment to UHC/SDGs.



8. Is there any other information you would like to share, including annual reports of your organization and any impact assessment or evaluation reports? If yes, please use the space below and attach the document(s). Please also use this space to provide any other information, comments or remarks you deem necessary:
Global Level

• HIV, Tuberculosis, Malaria, Viral Hepatitis, Neglected Tropical Diseases, Towards the end of the epidemics, Baseline report (2017). http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/258692/1/WHO-HTM-HMA-2017.03-eng.pdf

• Global hepatitis report 2017: http://www.who.int/hepatitis/publications/global-hepatitis-report2017/en/

• WHO Global TB Report 2017 linked explicitly to SDGs: http://www.who.int/tb/publications/global_report/en/ and Moscow Declaration to End TB (in 6 UN languages) http://www.who.int/tb/features_archive/Online_Consultation_MinisterialConferenceDeclaration/en

• Impact is tracked annually in the World Malaria Report published on the WHO website.

Regional Level

• AMRO has drafted an internal progress report on Regional Progress on the Sustainable Development Goals in early 2017. Since then there have been active efforts to mainstream the principles and priorities of the SDGs across the Organization’s activities.

• Selected EURO documents:

Many background and information documents were produced by all EURO colleagues, to support the roadmap. Please find here a list of selected publications. For more details, please visit

http://www.euro.who.int/en/about-us/governance/regional-committee-for-europe/67th-session/documentation/background-documents

Developing a common set of indicators for the joint monitoring framework for SDGs, Health 2020 and the Global NCD Action Plan (2017)

http://www.euro.who.int/en/health-topics/health-policy/sustainable-development-goals/publications.

Fact sheets on the sustainable development goals, health targets (ongoing work)

http://www.euro.who.int/en/media-centre/sections/fact-sheets/2017/fact-sheets-on-sustainable-development-goals-health-targets

Declaration of the 6th Ministerial Conference on Environment and health

http://www.euro.who.int/__data/assets/pdf_file/0007/341944/OstravaDeclaration_SIGNED.pdf?ua=1

Sustainable Development Goals: initial mapping of World Health Assembly and Regional Committee resolutions, strategies and action plans (2017)

http://www.euro.who.int/en/health-topics/health-policy/sustainable-development-goals/publications/2017/sustainable-development-goals-initial-mapping-of-world-health-assembly-and-regional-committee-resolutions,-strategies-and-action-plans-2017

Social return on investment – Accounting for value in the context of implementing Health 2020 and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development (2017)

http://www.euro.who.int/en/about-us/networks/small-countries-initiative/social-return-on-investment-accounting-for-value-in-the-context-of-implementing-health-2020-and-the-2030-agenda-for-sustainable-development-2017

Investment for health and well-being: a review of the social return on investment from public health policies to support implementing the Sustainable Development Goals by building on Health 2020.Health Evidence Network (HEN) synthesis report 51

http://www.euro.who.int/en/publications/abstracts/investment-for-health-and-well-being-a-review-of-the-social-return-on-investment-from-public-health-policies-to-support-implementing-the-sustainable-development-goals-by-building-on-health-2020-2017

Key policies for addressing the social determinants of health and health inequities. Health Evidence Network (HEN) synthesis report 52

http://www.euro.who.int/en/publications/abstracts/key-policies-for-addressing-the-social-determinants-of-health-and-health-inequities-2017

Environmentally sustainable health systems: a strategic document (2017)

http://www.euro.who.int/en/health-topics/Health-systems/public-health-services/publications/2017/environmentally-sustainable-health-systems-a-strategic-document-2017

Declaration of the Paris high-level conference. Working together for better health and well-being 7-8 December 2016, Paris, France

http://www.euro.who.int/__data/assets/pdf_file/0019/325180/Paris_Declaration_ENG.pdf?ua=1

Evidence on financing and budgeting mechanisms to support intersectoral actions between health, education, social welfare and labour sectors (2016).

http://www.euro.who.int/en/publications/abstracts/evidence-on-financing-and-budgeting-mechanisms-to-support-intersectoral-actions-between-health,-education,-social-welfare-and-labour-sectors-2016

Background Paper of the Paris high-level conference Working together for better health and well-being

http://www.euro.who.int/__data/assets/pdf_file/0008/324656/Background-Paper.pdf?ua=1

Health Diplomacy: European perspectives (2017)

http://www.euro.who.int/__data/assets/pdf_file/0009/347688/Health_Diplomacy_European_Perspectives.pdf?ua=1

Core health indicators, with a focus on the SDGs (2017)

http://www.euro.who.int/__data/assets/pdf_file/0005/346325/CHI_EN_WEB.pdf?ua=1

Voices of the Region:

http://www.euro.who.int/en/about-us/governance/regional-committee-for-europe/67th-session/voices-of-the-region



9. In your view, what should a strategic plan for the UN system in support of the 2030 Agenda and SDGs look like? What key elements should it include and major challenges address in such a road map?
Global Level

• Should include strong practical examples of cross-agency work in support of national 2030 agendas.

• It should redefine the focus on impact and in particularly country impact, and then cascade this down to how the UN is planning its activities and country capacity to support this.

Regional Level

• A strategic plan for the UN System in support of the 2030 Agenda and SDGs should feature opportunities for building Member State capacity to collect, analyze and interpret data, and translate evidence into policy. Robust, disaggregated data has been acknowledged as key to programming that addresses health inequities, a longstanding and intractable dynamic in the Region of the Americas.

• We also encourage use of systematic and formalized modes of two-way communications, for both sharing updates on progress and institutional guidance on ongoing trends and discussions concerning the 2030 Agenda.

• Given their comprehensive and interdependent nature, the SDGs challenge the UN system as well as Member States and partners to go beyond business as usual. This should be the starting point for a strategic plan for the UN system in support of the 2030 Agenda and SDGs.

• The need for stronger emphasis globally on changing the approach to research and innovation, going beyond specific conditions, challenges or issues to foster action research that links across programmes, sectors and stakeholders in the context of the SDGs.

• Leaving no-one behind is central to UHC and the SDGs. Attention to equity and related intersectionalities needs to be systematically integrated into all steps of the project cycle.

• Strengthening country and UN capacity for collection and management of disaggregated data (including using technological innovations to streamline and make reporting more efficient and reliable) and particularly increasing country capacity for good quality analysis of disaggregated data that will be useful for both policy and service delivery, will be critical for countries to be able to identify those left behind and the equity issues that need to be addressed. For the UN, capacity for more comparative analyses on key issues will be needed, which will be more complex than in the past due to the need to undertake more disaggregated analysis.

• The SDGs require new capabilities to advance whole-of-systems, whole-of-government and whole-of-society approaches that leave no-one behind. This will also require new capabilities in the UN system to inform, influence and institutionalise ways to advance the SDGs.



10. Please indicate one or two endeavor or initiatives you suggest that the UN system organizations could undertake together to support the implementation of the SDGs between now and 2030:
Global Level

• Cross-agenda internal consultations and civil society fora.

• UHC (SDG 3.8)

Regional Level

• AMRO has found Regional collaboration with ECLAC and other Regional stakeholders to be productive elements of its 2030 Agenda activities, with clear benefits for Member States. More Regional opportunities for cooperation and collaboration would be welcome.

• EURO has found the European Regional Director Coordination mechanisms as extremely helpful in coordinating the ensuring coherence across agencies.

• There is need to limit the data collection burden on countries by reporting better rather than reporting more. This requires mutual learning, better coordination across partners and issues, investment in analytical capacity in countries, and the use of analysis (including equity analysis) to inform policy and action.

• The SDGs require the operationalization of the commitment to leaving no one behind, offering opportunities for joint work (and resourcing) across sectors and organizations: this will require renewed efforts to promote mutual learning, continuous dialogue and learning, and stronger partnerships with old and newer partners.


The ‘Great Reset’ for dummies…

This is a strikingly excellent analysis

The Wall Will Fall

This article was originally posted at https://tessa.substack.com

By Tessa Lena

What is “the Great Reset”?

The Great Reset is a massively funded, desperately ambitious, internationally coordinated project led by some of the biggest multinational corporations and financial players on the planet and carried out by cooperating state bodies and NGOs. Its soul is a combination of early 20th century science fiction, idyllic Soviet posters, the obsessiveness of a deranged accountant with a gambling addiction—and an upgraded, digital version of “Manifest Destiny.”

The mathematical reason for the Great Reset is that thanks to technology, the planet has gotten small, and the infinite expansion economic model is bust—but obviously, the super wealthy want to continue staying super wealthy, and so they need a miracle, another bubble, plus a surgically precise system for managing what they perceive as “their limited resources.” Thus, they desperately want a bubble providing new growth out…

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The Great Replacement is United Nations Policy

Click to access PopFacts_2017-7.pdf