Great Reset: Transhumanism, Metaverse, Lawnmower Man in Real Life…

Transhumanism: The Convergence of Things in Motion Right Now

As suggested in the diagram above, there are philosophies, hardware innovations, prior accomplishments in biological science, the transmogrification of society with its “New Normal” and the melding of physical, augmented and virtual realities.

First off, do you guys and girls remember Lawnmower Man?

These factors at play include:

  • Transhumanist Movement Philosophy from the late 1990s
  • The incredible breakthrough of Cloning (which has since gone dark in the mainstream)
  • The recent announcement of the Metaverse; blending of physical, augmented and virtual realities
  • The Great Reset’s Fourth Industrial Revolution: emphasis on 3-D Printing, Quantum Computers and explicit “Human Enhancement”
  • Neurological Hardware innovations, for instance, Elon Musk’s Neural Link technology
  • Bill Gates

It is the convergence of this motley crew of happenings that point to a strong possibility of one day, a 140 year old Henry Kissinger, resembling a cross between a squid, a Japanese gothic raver chick and a wicked old Jewish Cantor – in attire crossing glam/goth/a weed Sherpa/and a gay diplomat. This could be a completely stereo-immersive type of material – with a self-replicating algorithmically deployed subversive cyber-chutzpah fuel cell/solar/biodiesel life.

TRANSHUMANIST MOVEMENT

The Transhumanist Declaration

The Transhumanist Declaration was originally crafted in 1998 by an international group of authors: Doug Baily, Anders Sandberg, Gustavo Alves, Max More, Holger Wagner, Natasha Vita-More, Eugene Leitl, Bernie Staring, David Pearce, Bill Fantegrossi, den Otter, Ralf Fletcher, Tom Morrow, Alexander Chislenko, Lee Daniel Crocker, Darren Reynolds, Keith Elis, Thom Quinn, Mikhail Sverdlov, Arjen Kamphuis, Shane Spaulding, and Nick Bostrom. This Transhumanist Declaration has been modified over the years by several authors and organizations. It was adopted by the Humanity+ Board in March, 2009.

  1. Humanity stands to be profoundly affected by science and technology in the future. We envision the possibility of broadening human potential by overcoming aging, cognitive shortcomings, involuntary suffering, and our confinement to planet Earth.
  2. We believe that humanity’s potential is still mostly unrealized. There are possible scenarios that lead to wonderful and exceedingly worthwhile enhanced human conditions.
  3. We recognize that humanity faces serious risks, especially from the misuse of new technologies. There are possible realistic scenarios that lead to the loss of most, or even all, of what we hold valuable. Some of these scenarios are drastic, others are subtle. Although all progress is change, not all change is progress.
  4. Research effort needs to be invested into understanding these prospects. We need to carefully deliberate how best to reduce risks and expedite beneficial applications. We also need forums where people can constructively discuss what should be done, and a social order where responsible decisions can be implemented.
  5. Reduction of existential risks, and development of means for the preservation of life and health, the alleviation of grave suffering, and the improvement of human foresight and wisdom should be pursued as urgent priorities, and heavily funded.
  6. Policy making ought to be guided by responsible and inclusive moral vision, taking seriously both opportunities and risks, respecting autonomy and individual rights, and showing solidarity with and concern for the interests and dignity of all people around the globe. We must also consider our moral responsibilities towards generations that will exist in the future.
  7. We advocate the well-being of all sentience, including humans, non-human animals, and any future artificial intellects, modified life forms, or other intelligences to which technological and scientific advance may give rise.
  8. We favour allowing individuals wide personal choice over how they enable their lives. This includes use of techniques that may be developed to assist memory, concentration, and mental energy; life extension therapies; reproductive choice technologies; cryonics procedures; and many other possible human modification and enhancement technologies.

Nick Bostrom is one of the most significant voices in the advocacy for Transhumanism becoming a reality. He still writes essays, appears on podcasts, Youtube videos, etc to this very day.

In an essay written in 1998, “WHAT IS TRANSHUMANISM?
by Nick Bostrom, the author foreshadowing the potential is quite eerie:

Vastly extended life spans. It may prove feasible to use radical gene-therapy and other biological methods to block normal aging processes, and to stimulate rejuvenation and repair mechanisms indefinitely. It is also possible that nothing short of nanotechnology will do the trick. Meanwhile there are unproven and in some cases expensive hormone treatments that seem to have some effect on general vitality in elderly people, although as yet nothing has been shown to be more effective at life-extension than controlled caloric restriction.

The interconnected world. Even in its present form, the Internet has an immense impact on some people’s lives. And its ramifications are just beginning to unfold. This is one area where radical change is quite widely perceived, and where media discussion has been extensive.

Uploading of our consciousness into a virtual reality. If we could scan the synaptic matrix of a human brain and simulate it on a computer then it would be possible for us to migrate from our biological embodiments to a purely digital substrate (given certain philosophical assumptions about the nature of consciousness and personal identity). By making sure we always had back-up copies, we might then enjoy effectively unlimited life-spans. By directing the activation flow in the simulated neural networks, we could engineer totally new types of experience. Uploading, in this sense, would probably require mature nanotechnology. But there are less extreme ways of fusing the human mind with computers. Work is being done today on developing neuro/chip interfaces. The technology is still in its early stages; but it might one day enable us to build neuroprostheses whereby we could “plug in” to cyberspace. Even less speculative are various schemes for immersive virtual reality — for instance, using head-mounted displays that communicate with the brain via our natural sense organs.

What Mr. Bostrom is commenting on here, more than 20 years ago, include:

  • Use of Nanotechnology
  • Genetic modification
  • Uploading one’s consciousness to a “virtual reality”
  • The necessity for an “interconnected world”
    • Physical, Virtual and Augmented worlds meshed into one (Metaverse vision)

So it was speculated upon – literally in the last millennia – the emergence of these seemingly separate radical ideas for technological advancement – then the convergence of such technologies.

Cloning

Cloning is a technique scientists use to make exact genetic copies of living things. Genes, cells, tissues, and even whole animals can all be cloned.

Scientists also make clones in the lab. They often clone genes in order to study and better understand them. To clone a gene, researchers take DNA from a living creature and insert it into a carrier like bacteria or yeast. Every time that carrier reproduces, a new copy of the gene is made.

Researchers can use clones in many ways. An embryo made by cloning can be turned into a stem cell factory. Stem cells are an early form of cells that can grow into many different types of cells and tissues. Scientists can turn them into nerve cells to fix a damaged spinal cord or insulin-making cells to treat diabetes.

Right now, our scientists and engineers are creating very advanced synthetic limbs that can be controlled with our thoughts. Our brain connects to our biological arms. We think and our biological arms move. The patient’s brain connects with these new prototype artificial arms and hands too. The patient thinks and the synthetic arms move.

Takeaway: the stem cell factory – as they can be harvested and grown into many types of cells and tissues, there is without doubt that limbs, internal organs and muscle tissue can be grown. And with the modifications made available by gene therapy and also infused nanotechnology – the creation of a super-human, healthy beast may house the mind of Henry Kissinger.

Imagine that, some 20 years from, a Henry Kissinger existing as a product of stem cell applications, quantum computer-capable nanotechnologies and his Zionist, globalist worldview giving a speech to the oligarchs of earth’s needed resources (water, food, energy, land) – giving a speech to the likes of the shadow government – CIA, BlackRock, DARPA, Exxon Mobil, Goldman Sachs, Apple, Lockheed Martin and John Deere – pressing for them to nuke China, Iran, Russia – for the glory of Jerusalem and to usher in the All-Seeing-Eye God from the Kabbalah…(these discussions are already taking place – only Kissinger is a hunched over merchant looking man – not exactly like Magneto. But Magneto he will wish to become and remain.

Metaverse; blending of physical, augmented and virtual realities

Author Neal Stephenson is credited with coining the term “metaverse” in his 1992 science fiction novel “Snow Crash,” in which he envisioned lifelike avatars who met in realistic 3D buildings and other virtual reality environments.

Since then, various developments have made mileposts on the way toward a real metaverse, an online virtual world which incorporates augmented reality, virtual reality, 3D holographic avatars, video and other means of communication. As the metaverse expands, it will offer a hyper-real alternative world for you to coexist in.

The Metaverse will be a combination of multiple elements of technology, including virtual reality, augmented reality and video where users “live” within a digital universe. Supporters of the metaverse envision its users working, playing and staying connected with friends through everything from concerts and conferences to virtual trips around to the world.

The metaverse promises a joined-up online experience, in which a single avatar can move between spaces – such as an online shop and a lecture theatre. However, many of the individual innovations mentioned in Facebook’s presentation already exist in some forms.

But Zuckerberg and his team are hardly the only tech visionaries with ideas on how the metaverse, which will employ a mix of virtual reality and other technologies, should take shape. And some who’ve been thinking about it for a while have concerns about a new world tied to a social media giant that could get access to even more personal data and is accused of failing to stop the proliferation of dangerous misinformation and other online harms that exacerbate real-world problems.

Think of it as the internet brought to life, or at least rendered in 3D. Zuckerberg has described it as a “virtual environment” you can go inside of — instead of just looking at on a screen. Essentially, it’s a world of endless, interconnected virtual communities where people can meet, work and play, using virtual reality headsets, augmented reality glasses, smartphone apps or other devices.

It also will incorporate other aspects of online life such as shopping and social media, according to Victoria Petrock, an analyst who follows emerging technologies.

“It’s the next evolution of connectivity where all of those things start to come together in a seamless, doppelganger universe, so you’re living your virtual life the same way you’re living your physical life,” she said.

Tech companies still have to figure out how to connect their online platforms to each other. Making it work will require competing technology platforms to agree on a set of standards, so there aren’t “people in the Facebook metaverse and other people in the Microsoft metaverse,” Petrock said.

CRITICAL TAKEAWAY: At current there is no unifying technology that precedes all other company’s various hardware and software – in terms of creating universal access to a Metaverse that will encompass the entirety of the digital space. In terms of tech companies working to “figure out” uniformity in the method to enter the Metaverse – what this really means is that there will be years of work to make this a reality. The work, will most absolutely call for tech companies, the robust Amazon, Microsoft, Google, Facebook, Apple, Qualcomm, Samsung – for instance – these are the companies that will be making acquisitions of tons of the smaller tech companies. Acquisitions that continue with the decimation of competition. Competition is the defining feature of a capitalist economy comprised of open markets. This is another stunt (like the pandemic induced shutdown of the millions of small and medium sized businesses that never reopened. The Metaverse is yet another dimension to the beast of globalization, which has worked to consolidate the wealth, resources and power into the hands of fewer and fewer seemingly every single day.

Sneakers in the Metaverse:

Transhumanism and the Fourth Industrial Revolution


Now, one of the three main goals of the Great Reset agenda is “to harness the innovations of the Fourth Industrial Revolution to support the public good…” As the founder of the WEF, Klaus Schwab, explains, the Fourth Industrial Revolution “will lead to a fusion of our physical, digital, and biological identities.”He specifically considers technologies that will change what it means to be human, because they will integrate into the human body and mind in order to overcome (‘transcend’) their limitations. Sound familiar? As Schwab himself admits, these new technologies can also “intrude into the hitherto private space of our minds, reading our thoughts and influencing our behavior…”While these technologies seem like science fiction, they are nearly at our doorstep. In fact, much of the pandemic response effort relies on Fourth Industrial Revolution technologies, such as genetic sequencing, vaccine biotechnology (mRNA and vector platforms), and contact tracing (mass surveillance) software. Social distancing measures have also forced people to replace their physical world with a virtual one, including digital versions of school, church, shopping, and even parties. While this has been a terrible loss for most people, this digitalisation of our lives (including COV-id apps and digital currency) is part of the WEF’s vision for our future, and therefore, in their view, quite desirable.

What is transhumanism?
In a nutshell, transhumanism is a philosophical movement which promotes the view that the human species should take control of its own evolution through human-enhancement technologies, such as brain implants and nanotechnology that reverses aging. This will then allow humanity to transcend its physical and mental limitations. The term itself was first coined in 1957 by Julian Huxley; the brother of Aldous Huxley, the famous author of the dystopian novel ‘Brave New World’.

The highly influential members of the World Economic Forum have a plan for what should come next. It is called ‘The Great Reset’, and it envisions a truly ‘transhumanist’ future for us all.

The World Economic Forum (WEF) is an annual conference where some of the wealthiest and most powerful people in the world come together for ‘public-private cooperation’. Since mid-2020, the WEF has been promoting its vision for our post-coronavirus future, which they call ‘The Great Reset’. In their view, the pandemic has exposed the weaknesses of our old system, and therefore presents a perfect opportunity to ‘reset’ our world and start anew. What is striking about this plan, which the WEF has condensed into a virus-shaped mindmap, is its implicit endorsement of a philosophy called ‘transhumanism’. The term is not used explicitly, but its values and goals can be seen at every level of the plan. Now, according to some, transhumanism is not just a new philosophy, but a new religion that will be the dominant worldview of humanity going forward.

A transhumanist paradise?
While there is a big debate about whether transhumanism should be defined as a religion or not, it definitely functions like a religion, in the sense that it provides a framework of meaning for human life that contains many of the goals of classical world religions. For example, most religions promise the goal of immortality, either in this life or after death. Some traditions (like Christianity and Islam) clearly aim for immortality after death (resurrection or heaven). Other traditions (like some forms of Daoism) have aimed for immortality in this life; usually through alchemical potions or self-cultivation, such as yoga and meditation. Transhumanism also aims for immortality, but through technology rather than through supernatural aid or spiritual transformation. Technologies that will be used for this include nanorobots, genetic engineering, and converting our brain activity into a digital form, and then uploading it into a supercomputer that will last forever (if possible). Secondly, most religions seek a state of permanent happiness, either in this life (nirvana in Buddhism) or after death (paradise in Christianity or Islam). Transhumanists think this can instead be achieved by creating ‘happiness drugs’ and brain-chip interfaces that manipulate the brain’s pleasure centres. Thirdly, most religions aspire for human beings to attain a state of divinity. The transhumanist ideal is likewise for humans to become god-like creators who can manipulate the material world at will (through 3D printing and atom-assembling nano-robots), and even to create new forms of life (through synthetic biology).All of this shows that transhumanism is based on the assumption that suffering (such as aging, sickness, and death) is a technical rather than a metaphysical problem, and can therefore be solved with more and better technology.

Bill Gates patented technology aimed to harvest living humans for cryptocurrency

In early 2020, Microsoft filed patent number ‘WO/2020/060606’

WO2020060606 – CRYPTOCURRENCY SYSTEM USING BODY ACTIVITY DATA

Human body activity associated with a task provided to a user may be used in a mining process of a cryptocurrency system. A server may provide a task to a device of a user which is communicatively coupled to the server. A sensor communicatively coupled to or comprised in the device of the user may sense body activity of the user. Body activity data may be generated based on the sensed body activity of the user. The cryptocurrency system communicatively coupled to the device of the user may verify if the body activity data satisfies one or more conditions set by the cryptocurrency system, and award cryptocurrency to the user whose body activity data is verified.

Blockchain used to commodify human actions?

This video and description is directly from the World Economic Forum YouTube:

Digital currencies built on distributed ledger technologies have emerged as potential gateways to new wealth creation. While still in the early stages of development, the technologies have the potential to transform entire systems, but they also face challenges, including lack of interoperability, security threats, centralization of power and unwillingness to experiment due to recent overhype. Sheila Warren, Head of the Platform for Shaping the Future of Blockchain and Distributed Ledger Technologies at the World Economic Forum, explains how the Forum and its partners work to ensure equity, transparency and trust in the governance of distributed ledger technology – and accelerate the necessary changes for this technology to reach its full potential.

Any one of these artist depictions may very well surround us all, VERY VERY SOON!

The Quest to Transcend Biological Limitations: What is Transhumanism? • Bishop’s Encyclopedia of Religion, Society and Philosophy

Transhumanism is, according to Nick Bostrom, the director of the Future of Humanity Institute at the University of Oxford, “a loosely defined movement that has developed gradually over the past two decades. It promotes an interdisciplinary approach to understanding and evaluating the opportunities for enhancing the human condition and the human organism opened up by […]

The Quest to Transcend Biological Limitations: What is Transhumanism? — Bishop’s Encyclopedia of Religion, Society and Philosophy