Supranational Globalist Projects #1: ORGANIZATIONS & INSTITUTIONS: CLUB OF ROME

Name: Club of Rome

Classification: Organizations & Institutions

Chaos Variant: Environmental Emergency

Key Associations: World Wildlife Foundation, Nature4Climate, Henry Kissinger, David Rockefeller, Zbigniew Brzezinski, Mikhail Gorbachev, Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, United Nations, World Economic Forum, Stockholm Resilience Center, Leaders Pledge for Nature, the Global Goal for Nature, UNFCCC Race to Zero and Race to Resilience campaigns and the 50×30 Coalition.

Gorbachev has a few select quotes on the aspect of Climate Change and a One World Order:

“There are two dangers threatening humanity… The threat of devastating war using weapons of mass destruction and the threat of ecological catastrophe due to accelerating global warming. It’s no longer possible to deny that [climate change is] connected with human activity.”

“The emerging ‘environmentalization’ of our civilization and the need for vigorous action in the interest of the entire global community will inevitably have multiple political consequences. Perhaps the most important of them will be a gradual change in the status of the United Nations. Inevitably, it must assume some aspects of a world government.”

It was within these walls of this is the organization, the concept of an Environmental Emergency aka Global Warming aka Climate Change emerged. It emerged as a central theme, a common enemy, for mankind to unite behind in fighting it.

Circa 2021, it is in plain sight that the Climate Hoax in the central mechanism in the implementation of a New World Order.

Two of the founding members are David Rockefeller and Henry Kissinger.

As of 2021, there are five “Impact Areas”:

IMPACT HUBS:

Youth Leadership & Intergenerational Dialogues:

In this context, the Club of Rome will establish a global young leadership programme, based on three key areas – Education, Engagement and Action. This approach encapsulates both the value of nurturing future leaders through education – inspired by the Club of Rome’s core vision for a sustainable future for humanity and the planet – whilst recognising that this learning process needs to be leveraged and translated into concrete projects with genuine and lasting impact. The leadership programme will focus on the Club’s guiding pillars: Climate Emergency, An Emerging New Civilization, Reclaiming & Re-framing Economics and Rethinking Finance.

The Planetary Emergency Partnership:

The Climate-Planetary Emergency Impact Hub aims to:

  • ensure that the transformations detailed in the Planetary Emergency Plan are adopted, and
  • raise awareness of the need for an integrated emergency response and the opportunity for transformation that emergence offers.

Published in 2019, the Planetary Emergency Plan provides a set of key policy levers to address the cross-cutting challenges of climate change, biodiversity loss and human health and well-being. Through implementing these actions, we can emerge from emergency and ensure long-term resilience and well-being within our planetary boundaries.

For years, scientists warned about the risks of straying beyond our planetary boundaries. The Limits to Growth report issued the first warning about unsustainable human activity on our planet 50 years ago. In 1972, its authors made the case that unlimited growth in population, material goods and resources on a finite planet would eventually lead to the collapse of Earth’s environmental and economic systems. Yet, it was only in 2020 that the public at large experienced the real impact of the encroachment of humanity on these limits through a zoonotic disease called COVID-19.

Living our lives as if Earth is infinite and shock resistant as we are doing today, is pushing our planet towards a series of tipping points that will become the greatest existential threat to humanity. Decades of exponential consumption and population growth have come to imperil the Earth’s climate and life-supporting systems, while reinforcing social and economic inequalities globally.

The Planetary Emergency Plan
Too often, interconnected crises are viewed in siloes, when there is an urgent need to address them as one integrated challenge. The Planetary Emergency Plan, which was drafted in partnership with the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK), aims to do just that.

First published in 2019, the Planetary Emergency Plan provides a set of key policy levers to address the cross-cutting challenges of climate change, biodiversity loss and human health and well-being. The Plan outlines a vision of transformation and regeneration; a roadmap for governments and other stakeholders to shift our societies and economies to bring back balance between people, planet and prosperity. Only then can we truly emerge from emergency.

The Plan is a novel contribution to the emergency debate, recognising the inextricable interconnectedness of the three challenges referred to above and providing an alternative approach to conventional siloed, sectoral policy action. It combines a focus on protecting and restoring our Global Commons with implementing a series of economic and social transformations to guarantee the long-term health and well-being of people and planet.

Since being launched at the UN Climate Action Summit in 2019, the Planetary Emergency Plan has been infused into international discussions on climate, biodiversity, sustainable development and global risks. It forms the foundation of a global Planetary Emergency Partnership and has inspired global campaigns and policy efforts.

COVID-19 has further exposed our vulnerabilities and reinforced the case for emergency action. Therefore, the Planetary Emergency Plan 2.0 accurately reflects the convergence of three urgent crises (climate, biodiversity and health) and guides the work of the Planetary Emergency Partnership post-COVID.

Decade of action
The Planetary Emergency Partnership strives to raise awareness for an integrated, systemic approach that addresses the cross-cutting challenges of climate change, biodiversity loss and human health and well-being. The partnership advocates for implementation of the commitments and actions of the Planetary Emergency Plan, and builds momentum for a recognition that we are in a Planetary Emergency.

Bringing together voices from the climate, biodiversity and health communities the partnership emphasises the need for a decade of decisive delivery to ensure we meet the interlinked 2030 agendas.

Initiated by The Club of Rome and Potsdam Institute for Climate-Impact Research, with initial partners WWF and Nature4Climate, the Planetary Emergency Partnership now consists of over 350 scientists, policymakers, business leaders, youth representatives and NGOs. The Partnership supports the Leaders Pledge for Nature, the Global Goal for Nature, UNFCCC Race to Zero and Race to Resilience campaigns and the 50×30 Coalition.

By bringing together civil society organisations, academics, scientists, business leaders and public officials from across the globe, the partnership provides one of the largest, unbranded civil society coordination platforms to help build for a successful ‘triple crown’ of the UN Food Systems Summit, CBD COP15 and COP26 summits in 2021.

Summary Report of 2020 activities.

The Planetary Emergency Partnership meets monthly for a virtual strategy discussion on specific policy areas and key influencing moments. Partner calls focus on calls to action, intelligence briefings, network-building and coordination on collective targets and campaigns. We welcome new Partners to join us.

  • Summary of Limits to Growth:

    Published 1972 – The message of this book still holds today: The earth’s interlocking resources – the global system of nature in which we all live – probably cannot support present rates of economic and population growth much beyond the year 2100, if that long, even with advanced technology. In the summer of 1970, an international team of researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology began a study of the implications of continued worldwide growth. They examined the five basic factors that determine and, in their interactions, ultimately limit growth on this planet-population increase, agricultural production, nonrenewable resource depletion, industrial output, and pollution generation. The MIT team fed data on these five factors into a global computer model and then tested the behavior of the model under several sets of assumptions to determine alternative patterns for mankind’s future. The Limits to Growth is the nontechnical report of their findings. The book contains a message of hope, as well: Man can create a society in which he can live indefinitely on earth if he imposes limits on himself and his production of material goods to achieve a state of global equilibrium with population and production in carefully selected balance.

  • 1972- Limits to Growth is published

    Under the supervision Dennis Meadows, a group of professors at MIT were commissioned by the Club to study the complex problems with which the group was grappling, using the now-famous World3 computer model. The result was the publication of The Limits to Growth in 1972, a milestone for the Club and a definitive moment in the advent of the sustainability movement. The Report was ground-breaking, as the first to fundamentally challenge the dominant paradigm of unbridled economic growth without regard for its environmental consequences.

    Download the book:

    <object class="wp-block-file__embed" data="https://muunyayo.files.wordpress.com/2021/10/limits-to-growth-digital-scan-version-1.pdf&quot; type="application/pdf" style="width:100%;height:600px" aria-label="Embed of <strong>Limits to Growth pdfLimits to Growth pdf
Reframing Economics:

Beyond GDP:


The objectives of the Reframing Economics Impact Hub are to:

push for the exploration of economic thinking that promotes the well-being of people and the planet to ensure a reversal of crucial eco system, climate and social tipping points created by humanity’s thirst for economic growth.
advocate for a shift from the current system which is based on fundamentally flawed economic theory and indicators promoting a growth centric philosophy.


As stated by American politician, Robert Kennedy, in his speech on Beyond GDP in 1968: “The gross national product does not allow for the health of our children, the quality of their education or the joy of their play. It does not include the beauty of our poetry or the strength of our marriages, the intelligence of our public debate or the integrity of our public officials. It measures neither our wit nor our courage, neither our wisdom nor our learning, neither our compassion nor our devotion to our country, it measures everything in short, except that which makes life worthwhile.”

Almost fifty years have passed since the launch of the “Limits to Growth” report by the Club of Rome. Its key message was that a combination of resource depletion and pollution, if unchecked, would ultimately bring the global economy down. This is the situation today.

Meeting the Sustainable Development Goals within Planetary Boundaries:

Earth4All is an international initiative to accelerate the systems-changes we need for an equitable future on a finite planet. Combining the best available science with new economic thinking, Earth4All is designed to identify the transformations we need to create prosperity for all. Earth4All is initiated by The Club of Rome, the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, the Stockholm Resilience Centre and the Norwegian Business School. It builds on the legacies of The Limits to Growth and the Planetary Boundaries frameworks.Earth4All will publish a major report in advance of the Stockholm+50 summit. The report will focus on transformational economics and five essential policy turnarounds to achieve the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals within Planetary Boundaries.

Transforming Economics:

The Transformational Economics Commission aims to provide decision makers with insights on how to protect the interests of people and the planet, prepare for future crises and build resilience, and transform our societies, economies, and our relationship with the planet.Previous Club of Rome reports have highlighted the need for transformative action, providing pathways and urgent actions that are required. The Transformational Economics Commission will take this further and analyse the economic and financial paradigm shifts necessary to ensure the adoption and implementation of these actions across different geographies.At this significant moment in history where we see the impact of the convergence of the health-climate-biodiversity loss tipping points and the growing existential risk to the survival of all species, the time has come for key systems thinkers, economists and policy leaders to come together as a collective of solution providers for resilience building to future shocks. The Transformational Economics Commission will focus on highlighting the need to replace short-term thinking with long term policies and systemic change, while considering today’s existing policy frameworks and intergenerational inequity.As part of the Earth4All initiative, the results will be published in a report in May 2022, which will include policy implementation scenarios and transformative pathways towards both environmentally and socially sustainable economies.

Rethinking Finance:

The monetisation of all transactions will need to be re-visited to enhance the equitable distribution of wealth and ensure broader well-being of all peoples. This means putting conscious effort and science into moving away from finance as a value system benefiting the few to accelerating a move toward real economy wealth creation for the many.

With a view of moving the current sustainable finance discussion from surface changes to the deep shift needed in our relationship to money and the existing finance system at large, the new Club of Rome Finance Impact Hub brings together real economy actors, investors, thoughts leaders to address core systemic alterations needed to support a well-being economy in balance with nature and responding to core global tipping points.

The Finance Impact Hub was launched on 20th February 2020 with a high-level roundtable at the Club’s new EU office, housed at Triodos Bank in Brussels. It convened officials from the European Institutions, EIB, ECB, Central Banks, Impact Investors, Finance Institutes, Foundations, Academics, and Members of the Club of Rome. Its primary objective was to explore key areas of change and existing leverage points and commence a co-creation partnership with a community of champions.

The spirit of the new Finance Hub is anchored in the seminal report to The Club of Rome, “The Limits to Growth” (1972), where calls were made for a deep-systems shift away from conventional finance models to one at the service of people-planet-prosperity. A series of publications since have continued to call for this shift. In particular, the Club of Rome’s Climate and Planetary Emergency Plans published in September 2019, calling for a decade of action that will enable the necessary change in systems to ensure long-term environmental and social sustainability.


From the Website: https://www.clubofrome.org/about-us/

About The Club of Rome
The Club of Rome was created to address the multiple crises facing humanity and the planet. Drawing on the unique, collective know-how of our 100 members – notable scientists, economists, business leaders and former politicians – we seek to define comprehensive solutions to the complex, interconnected challenges of our world.

Decades of exponential consumption and population growth have come to imperil the earth’s climate and life-supporting systems, while reinforcing social and economic inequalities and impoverishing billions globally.

As a network of thought leaders from a rich diversity of expertise, our members are committed to facilitating the difficult conversations and the bold actions required to confront the planetary emergency facing humanity and our common home. Our goal is to actively advocate for paradigm and systems shifts which will enable society to emerge from our current crises, by promoting a new way of being human, within a more resilient biosphere.

Drawing on thorough scientific analysis, the Club of Rome makes holistic proposals to address these immense, interconnected problems. It does so through research, concrete policy proposals and the convening of high-level meetings, debates, conferences, lectures and other events.

It also publishes a limited number of peer-reviewed “Reports to the Club of Rome”. Its seminal, best-selling 1972 report, The Limits to Growth, alerted the world to the consequences of the interactions between human systems and the health of our planet. Since then, more than 45 Reports have reinforced and expanded that intellectual foundation.

Recently, the Club has prioritised five key areas of impact: Climate-Planetary Emergency, Reclaiming and Reframing Economics; Rethinking Finance; Emerging New Civilization(s); Youth Leadership.

The efforts of our members are supported by the International Secretariat in Winterthur (Switzerland) a satellite office in Brussels (Belgium) and National Associations in more than 30 countries.

EMERGING NEW CIVILIZATIONS INITIATIVE (ENCI)

The Club of Rome is repositioning itself to challenge humanity to rise to its full potential and become good stewards of the Earth’s limited resources. Our call is anchored on the need for a paradigm shift in our fundamental belief matrix, and the complex economic, financial, social systems underpinning our daily interactions. We are determined to identify and mobilize those already engaged in the quest for a New Civilization to become part of a Network of Networks to pursue this vision.

The exploration of a New Civilization is being enriched by the responses of many fellow explorers who are engaged in asking tough questions of humanity in a variety of spaces. Common threads are emerging that affirm what we already know:

  • We are living beings who are inherently relational
  • Wisdom of ancients tells us that “the I Am because you Are”, the African Ubuntu philosophy, or there is “no Me without We.” Buddhists and other indigenous knowledge systems also have similar orientations. This wisdom enabled humanity to evolve into the intelligent species it is today, and we would be remiss not to tap into it.
  • The emergence of the need for a New Civilization is a manifestation of a rising consciousness of who we are as humans, and what values would best shape our relationships to one another and to nature.
  • New paradigms are needed to foster core values that promote human dignity, respect for nature and protection of the commons, beyond current.

Muunyayo disposition: alot of Marxist, cultural Marxist, equality, pseudoscience.

History:


Most influential organizations begin with the meeting of a few like minds. In 1965, Aurelio Peccei, an Italian industrialist, made a speech that proved inspirational to Alexander King, the Scottish Head of Science at the OECD. The two found that they shared a profound concern for the long-term future of humanity and the planet, what they termed the modern ‘predicament of mankind’.

Three years later, King and Peccei convened a meeting of European scientists in Rome. Although this first attempt failed to achieve unity, a core group of like-minded thinkers emerged. Their goal: to advance three core ideas that still define the Club of Rome today: a global and a long-term perspective, and the concept of “problematique”, a cluster of intertwined global problems, be they economic, environmental, political or social.

At the group’s first major gathering in 1970, Jay Forrester, a systems professor at MIT, offered to use computer models he had developed to study the complex problems which concerned the group more rigorously. An international team of researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology began a study of the implications of unbridled exponential growth. They examined the five basic factors that determine and, in their interactions, ultimately limit growth on this planet – population, agricultural production, non-renewable resource depletion, industrial output and pollution.

In 1972, the Club’s first major Report, The Limits to Growth was published. It sold millions of copies worldwide, creating media controversy and also impetus for the global sustainability movement. This call for objective, scientific assessment of the impact of humanity’s behavior and use of resources, still defines the Club of Rome today. While Limits had many messages, it fundamentally confronted the unchallenged paradigm of continuous material growth and the pursuit of endless economic expansion. Fifty years later, there is no doubt that the ecological footprint of humanity substantially exceeds its natural limits every year. The concerns of the Club of Rome have not lost their relevance.

Current Membership:

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